DFS's review system is now LIVE!!! Read more here.

#31

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
(This post was last modified: 11-30-2016, 09:05 PM by BadDad.)
Also...Chevrolet has been producing the Corvette non-stop since 1953 or so, and current production models are every bit as loved and appreciated as classic production models despite tremendous changes in poerformance, efficiency and styling.

Same for the Ford Mustang since 1964...

More examples could be found in Harley-Davidson, Indian, Norton and Triumph motorcycles...
-Chris~Head Shaver~
#32

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
(11-30-2016, 07:05 PM)MileMarker60 Wrote:
(11-30-2016, 06:02 PM)BadDad Wrote: I never said anything about restarting history, I said it was to continue history. The name Wade & Butcher represents a level of quality and detail. If the new owners of that brand can provide the same level of quality and attention to details as the original manufacturers did, than the brand of Wade & Butcher will continue to represent that level of quality and craftsmanship........

Materials and processes are VASTLY improved over what W&B had in the past. Assuming that quality will be lower, even though techniques, materials, and equipment is greatly improved, is kind of silly. Better tools, better knowledge, better materials, and better science very rarely come together to make a lower quality product.

You are correct you didn't say "re-start" you said continue.
IMHO.. you can't continue history of a company that's been dead for 100 years
It would be like Chevrolet (or Ford, etc..) stopping production .
100 years later 10 guys decide to restart the brand and put out 1000 really nice cars in 2-3 different models. Regardless of how nice the 2-3 models are, it's not going live up to the standards of the years of classic cars produced and admired.

While the steel and the HT's process are without a doubt more consistent. The razor itself still comes down to a person grinding it.
Dovo, T.I.,etc.. they all use a 100 year old design, double wheel wet grinder. The rest of the hobby/custom makers use a 2x72 (or similar) belt grinder.

Like I've said.. I'm sure they can make a quality razor. I doubt they would build the hype if they didn't plan to put out something nice.
I just question the use of the Wade & Butcher branding.

I will also admit that I'm completely aware that not everyone is going to be a sentimental about the names as I'm

Chris (BadDad), I have to go along with MileMarker60 on this one.  I am basing this on my other love, fountain pens, and lately there has been a trend to revive classic fountain pen names long after the original companies have died.  An example is Conklin.  The company, founded in 1898, went out of business many decades ago, in 1949, but the name was revived a few years ago.  I have a couple of the vintage crescent fillers and a couple of the new ones and I have to say that the quality differences are noticeable, to the detriment of the newer ones.  Many older fountain pens had gold nibs while most of today's have steel ones, unless one is willing to spend a lot for a gold nib (which can easily add over $100 to the cost of the pen).  The new pens do not write as smoothly as the originals and the material the pen body is made of is different so the feel in hand is also different (though which one prefers may be personal).  Don't misunderstand; the newer versions are not bad pens but they are not great and, yes, the feeling of history is gone, at least for me.  The new Conklins are made by a conglomerate that produces several different pen brands and many, if not all, use the same modern nibs.  Perhaps, in twenty-five or thirty years, or more, history will be kind to these newer iterations but for me, at least, there is no magic in them.  Wade & Butcher is a well respected name that, like Conklin (and others) in the pen world, should have remained a part of history while new ventures should be making their own history and not riding on the back of a respected name.  This, obviously, is just my 2¢ worth so take it for what it's worth.  I am in no way discounting your points.  I just feel that sometimes there is more than making a good product with an old name to get a jump-start.  The originals have a je ne sais quoi that the newer versions will not be able to match.
[+] 2 users like this post
#33

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
You can't argue with nostalgia, and I won't try. I am perfectly happy to agree to disagree on that point.

My only contention was the insistence by some that quality would be diminished. We don't know that until one produced.
-Chris~Head Shaver~
[+] 1 user likes this post
#34

Member
TN
(11-30-2016, 09:02 PM)BadDad Wrote: Also...Chevrolet has been producing the Corvette non-stop since 1953 or so, and current production models are every bit as loved and appreciated as classic production models despite tremendous changes in poerformance, efficiency and styling.

Same for the Ford Mustang since 1964...

More examples could be found in Harley-Davidson, Indian, Norton and Triumph motorcycles...

There is a huge difference in your Dodge Charger example. Dodge didn't go out of business, they just discounted the model then brought it back years later.


A better example is one you pointed out. Indian Motorcycles! A business that went bankrupt in 53, then bought back to life in 2011.
I don't think you're going to find many people that look at the "new" Indian the same way they look at early 1910-1950 Indians.
It's not because the new one is junk... It's just not the "Old" Indian if you know what I mean.
[+] 2 users like this post
#35

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
(11-30-2016, 10:29 PM)MileMarker60 Wrote: There is a huge difference in your Dodge Charger example. Dodge didn't go out of business, they just discounted the model then brought it back years later.


A better example is one you pointed out. Indian Motorcycles! A business that went bankrupt in 53, then bought back to life in 2011.
I don't think you're going to find many people that look at the "new" Indian the same way they look at early 1910-1950 Indians.
It's not because the new one is junk... It's just not the "Old" Indian if you know what I mean.

I don't think the Dodge examples are wrong. The company is under different ownership today than it was in 1971, the models are manufactured in different facilities than they were in 1971, and the production techniques are different than they were in 1971. The only thing that is the same is the model designators. Seems like a fair comparison to me...

And the people that dislike the new Indians, versus the old Indians do so for nostalgic reasons, not quality issues.

Can't argue with nostalgia, and I certainly won't argue with your love of the history of the name Wade & Butcher. Nostalgia is what it is, and appeals to everyone differently.

My only concern is the idea that new razors cannot be of the same or better quality than the old razors. Logic indicates that the quality of a razor manufactured today can FAR exceed the quality of a razor manufactured in 1901. That's logic.

To say that one does not like resurrecting the name of Wade & Butcher for nostalgic reasons is different than saying there can be no comparison between a razor made under new ownership in South Africa, and a razor made under old ownership in Sheffield, England.

Nostalgia does not create quality. In fact, very often nostalgia will create a fondness for an inferior product based on an intangible emotional attachment, rather than the actual quality and/or utility of the product...
-Chris~Head Shaver~
#36

Member
TN
It's been a fun topic, but we clear see things a little different, which is cool.
We can agree to disagree.
[+] 2 users like this post
#37

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
(11-30-2016, 10:57 PM)MileMarker60 Wrote: It's been a fun topic, but we clear see things a little different, which is cool.
We can agree to disagree.

That's what keeps things interesting...different ideas and perceptions, different opinions and preferences.

In the end, it is tough to beat intelligent conversation from different perspectives that maintains civility and respect...
-Chris~Head Shaver~
[+] 2 users like this post
#38

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
(11-30-2016, 11:22 PM)BadDad Wrote:
(11-30-2016, 10:57 PM)MileMarker60 Wrote: It's been a fun topic, but we clear see things a little different, which is cool.
We can agree to disagree.

That's what keeps things interesting...different ideas and perceptions, different opinions and preferences.

In the end, it is tough to beat intelligent conversation from different perspectives that maintains civility and respect...

That is what made this conversation both interesting and worthwhile. Happy2
[+] 2 users like this post


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)