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#41

Living on the edge
Rolleyes Ohhh and I forgot....apparently I need a loupe as well
#42

Living on the edge
(This post was last modified: 09-22-2019, 10:01 AM by Tester28.)
Pure zen..until the techno track kicks in.

Appears to me that he uses each of those 4 small rocks to create a slurry
of different grits on the base slab...for progressive levels of finishing.
So the real magic is in the small rocks then, not the slab he's honing on?

Can someone break down what is going on here?


#43
(09-22-2019, 09:51 AM)Tester28 Wrote: Pure zen..until the techno track kicks in.

Appears to me that he uses each of those 4 small rocks to create a slurry
of different grits on the base slab...for progressive levels of finishing.
So the real magic is in the small rocks then, not the slab he's honing on?

Can someone break down what is going on here?




There’s entire websites devoted to what’s going on here. Here’s one:

http://www.tomonagura.com

I would recommend researching synthetic stones.

Tester28 likes this post
#44

Member
Knoxville, TN
(09-22-2019, 09:51 AM)Tester28 Wrote: Pure zen..until the techno track kicks in.

Appears to me that he uses each of those 4 small rocks to create a slurry
of different grits on the base slab...for progressive levels of finishing.
So the real magic is in the small rocks then, not the slab he's honing on?

Can someone break down what is going on here?



Mikawa nagura are a way to get a sequence of coarser grits without buying separate coarse hones. They’re generally softer than the hone, so the slurry is almost all Mikawa nagura. When you’re done with the Mikawa, you final finish using a tomo nagura, a slurry stone that’s similar in hardness/fineness to the hone.

They’re generally slower than a set of synths, but fun to use. Hope this helps!

Tester28 likes this post


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