#1

Living on the edge
3PM New York time TODAY (sunday).
#2

Living on the edge
(This post was last modified: 08-19-2022, 12:03 PM by Tester28.)
There was a drop yesterday I think.
10 brushes: 8 synthetic, 2 badger.
Seriously...does anyone get any fun out of this business model?
Maximum stress scrambling to purchase... and only 10 guys get to smoke the
post coital cigarette. Funny.

PS. Needless to say, I do not even try for such contests any more.

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#3
(08-19-2022, 11:57 AM)Tester28 Wrote: There was a drop yesterday I think.
10 brushes: 8 synthetic, 2 badger.
Seriously...does anyone get any fun out of this business model?
Maximum stress scrambling to purchase... and only 10 guys get to smoke the
post coital cigarette. Funny.

PS. Needless to say, I do not even try for such contests any more.

Totally agree. At this price point there are many high quality alternatives with lesser stress.

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#4

Veni, vidi, vici
Vault 111
That business model is not for me. Gimmicky.

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~~~~
Primo
Shaving since 1971; enjoying my shaves since 2014
A che bel vivere, che bel piacere, per un barbiere di qualità! Happy2
#5
(This post was last modified: 08-24-2022, 01:14 PM by rudyvey.)
Being a brush maker myself (probably one of the very early ones...), I never understood what the benefit of this business model is. You want a brush from me, you talk to me and we design your custom brush together, and I make it for you. Simple...maybe I do not sell as much as others, but it satisfies me that the customer gets what he want.

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#6

Posting Freak
Peachtree City, GA
(This post was last modified: 08-24-2022, 02:00 PM by DanLaw.)
(08-24-2022, 01:12 PM)rudyvey Wrote: Being a brush maker myself (probably one of the very early ones...), I never understood what the benefit of this business model is. You want a brush from me, you talk to me and we design your custom brush together, and I make it for you. Simple...maybe I do not sell as much as others, but it satisfies me that the customer gets what he want.

prêt-à-porter vs bespoke....

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#7
(This post was last modified: 08-24-2022, 03:14 PM by Moriarty.)
(08-24-2022, 01:12 PM)rudyvey Wrote: Being a brush maker myself (probably one of the very early ones...), I never understood what the benefit of this business model is. You want a brush from me, you talk to me and we design your custom brush together, and I make it for you. Simple...maybe I do not sell as much as others, but it satisfies me that the customer gets what he want.
But what should you do when the demand far exceeds your capacity? I don’t think anyone has found an ideal solution for this, and there probably isn’t one. Like some others, Wald has opted for a low-publicity drop method so that if someone really wants his brushes they can follow his instagram closely and they’ll have a decent chance - at least as much as anyone else, and better than most. It’s fair and democratic, and it at least stops a few collectors monopolizing his supply and then telling everyone about these marvellous brushes you can’t get, and it helps stop the scalpers who buy everything and re-sell for a profit.

If he took orders then his order book would quickly get out of control and customers would be waiting a very long time to get their brushes - like Varlet, who had to stop accepting orders for at least a year so they could catch up. And then he would be deluged with complaints and either have to deal with them or ignore them so he can get on with making the brushes. It’s much better to restrict people ordering in the first place.

If the surprise drop method puts some people off then it’s because they aren’t as desirous to buy one as others are, so the people who most want one are the ones who get them. Isn’t that a good and fair way to restrict demand and ensure the limited supply goes to the people who most want it? If there was a better way then I’m sure Wald and others would love to do it, but the reality is that he does not produce anywhere near enough brushes for everybody to get one. And you can’t expect him to increase his production or invest more money into his business - I’m sure it’s something he does in his spare time and it is up to him how much time he wants to spend making brushes and the quality he makes them to. We can’t demand that he mortgages his home and borrows money to buy more equipment and space, take on staff, and expand his business - so he would be working for the bank and no longer for himself - and who knows if the high demand for Wald brushes will last forever? I imagine making brushes is something he enjoys doing as a commercial hobby, and he would like to keep enjoying it.

I can’t see what Jannik could do differently.
#8

Posting Freak
Peachtree City, GA
Beg to differ. Contrived demand generation
#9
(08-24-2022, 01:12 PM)rudyvey Wrote: Being a brush maker myself (probably one of the very early ones...), I never understood what the benefit of this business model is. You want a brush from me, you talk to me and we design your custom brush together, and I make it for you. Simple...maybe I do not sell as much as others, but it satisfies me that the customer gets what he want.
It makes the products more desirable, they look more precious etc.. Maker controls the demand. People want what they can't have. And this doesn't apply just here.

Marketing 101.

The negative is that you gain a lot of haters, but the vast majority of them are just jealous.

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#10

Dapper Chap
Jolly Old England
(08-24-2022, 03:11 PM)Moriarty Wrote:
(08-24-2022, 01:12 PM)rudyvey Wrote: Being a brush maker myself (probably one of the very early ones...), I never understood what the benefit of this business model is. You want a brush from me, you talk to me and we design your custom brush together, and I make it for you. Simple...maybe I do not sell as much as others, but it satisfies me that the customer gets what he want.
But what should you do when the demand far exceeds your capacity? I don’t think anyone has found an ideal solution for this, and there probably isn’t one. Like some others, Wald has opted for a low-publicity drop method so that if someone really wants his brushes they can follow his instagram closely and they’ll have a decent chance - at least as much as anyone else, and better than most. It’s fair and democratic, and it at least stops a few collectors monopolizing his supply and then telling everyone about these marvellous brushes you can’t get, and it helps stop the scalpers who buy everything and re-sell for a profit.

If he took orders then his order book would quickly get out of control and customers would be waiting a very long time to get their brushes - like Varlet, who had to stop accepting orders for at least a year so they could catch up. And then he would be deluged with complaints and either have to deal with them or ignore them so he can get on with making the brushes. It’s much better to restrict people ordering in the first place.

If the surprise drop method puts some people off then it’s because they aren’t as desirous to buy one as others are, so the people who most want one are the ones who get them. Isn’t that a good and fair way to restrict demand and ensure the limited supply goes to the people who most want it? If there was a better way then I’m sure Wald and others would love to do it, but the reality is that he does not produce anywhere near enough brushes for everybody to get one. And you can’t expect him to increase his production or invest more money into his business - I’m sure it’s something he does in his spare time and it is up to him how much time he wants to spend making brushes and the quality he makes them to. We can’t demand that he mortgages his home and borrows money to buy more equipment and space, take on staff, and expand his business - so he would be working for the bank and no longer for himself - and who knows if the high demand for Wald brushes will last forever? I imagine making brushes is something he enjoys doing as a commercial hobby, and he would like to keep enjoying it.

I can’t see what Jannik could do differently.

One vote here for the Wolfman style wait list, put your name down and then when it comes up choose knot, handle etc.

No one misses out and is fair to everyone involved.

Yes, there is a wait and no instant gratification but what is this obsession with these "Drop" events?

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