#11

Member
West Coast USA
Is there a decent sous vide machine that can fit in a compact (read: apartment) kitchen? Always wanted to give it a try.
#12

Merchant
Central Maine
(This post was last modified: 03-11-2019, 05:28 AM by ShadowsDad.)
First, Sous Vide is worth doing and yes, you can get a machine that will fit in a tiny space, as long as you already have pots and pans. The one I use clips onto a pot and that is the vessel that the SV unit controls. I sometimes use a pot but mostly a larger cooler (18 quart?) or a cambro container, both tops of which I cut to fit the unit semi snugly. Tonight I SVed a bunch of venison steaks that were given to me. I had done the thorough cooking 6 months ago and had them in their bags in the freezer. Today I remembered them and 1 hr in the SV bath brought them right to where they should be with no loss of quality. A draining, then sprinkling with dextrose, and hit them with the torch got me "grilled" venison when the grill is under a ton of snow. SV is tailor made for steaks with no marbling... ie: game meat. They had great grilled meat flavor, were moist, and delicious. If I was single today I would definitely have SV in my repertoire to impress the ladies with the food quality. And what guy doesn't like showing off with fire even if it's a butane torch?

Just don't do as my brother did and buy the SV machine, cook some steaks to a perfect med' rare and not brown them. That's boiled beef and doesn't have the flavor. get reducing sugar onto the meat and brown it (torch) to get the Maillard reaction to occur. A little sodium Bicarb helps the browning, but I can no longer use it due to the sodium. I pick and choose my sodium exposure today. But normal folks can use the sod' bicarb' along with the sugar.

Not only does it work with lean game, but it works with much lesser cuts of beef. I can take unmarbled, tough, beef and turn it into something that if your eyes were closed, you'd swear was the best beef fillet. I do that regularly with lesser cuts of roast so that I can get roast beef cold cuts that I can eat w/o sodium. It also gives me the option to spice it up as I wish. The last batch of roast beef cost us $3.49/lb. If it wasn't tender and delicious I wouldn't bother, but it is. It's not the same size as a commercial cold cut roast beef, but so what? Mine has the flavor I want and it's low sodium. The same product (or similar product) can't be purchased at the deli. Lately if I want sandwich innards I need to make them myself. Chicken salad gets me chicken stock for other uses after the braise. Rare roast beef gets me stock as well in the form of bag juices. As of yet I haven't SVed fish or shrimp. But SVed shrimp in the shells should give an outstanding stock and so would fish pieces SV for the stock. I bet perfectly done SV salmon would be to kill for. No need to torch, just have a great sauce. I need to stop this. Big Grin

If you do a search for Sous Vide machines or controllers you'll turn up all sorts. I was a part of the Sansaire funding and that's what I still use. It works fine but there are smaller and maybe better priced units today.
Brian. Lover of SE razors. Maker of Krampert's Finest Products.
#13
(03-11-2019, 05:24 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: First, Sous Vide is worth doing and yes, you can get a machine that will fit in a tiny space, as long as you already have pots and pans. The one I use clips onto a pot and that is the vessel that the SV unit controls. I sometimes use a pot but mostly a larger cooler (18 quart?) or a cambro container, both tops of which I cut to fit the unit semi snugly. Tonight I SVed a bunch of venison steaks that were given to me. I had done the thorough cooking 6 months ago and had them in their bags in the freezer. Today I remembered them and 1 hr in the SV bath brought them right to where they should be with no loss of quality. A draining, then sprinkling with dextrose, and hit them with the torch got me "grilled" venison when the grill is under a ton of snow. SV is tailor made for steaks with no marbling... ie: game meat. They had great grilled meat flavor, were moist, and delicious. If I was single today I would definitely have SV in my repertoire to impress the ladies with the food quality. And what guy doesn't like showing off with fire even if it's a butane torch?

Just don't do as my brother did and buy the SV machine, cook some steaks to a perfect med' rare and not brown them. That's boiled beef and doesn't have the flavor. get reducing sugar onto the meat and brown it (torch) to get the Maillard reaction to occur. A little sodium Bicarb helps the browning, but I can no longer use it due to the sodium. I pick and choose my sodium exposure today. But normal folks can use the sod' bicarb' along with the sugar.

Not only does it work with lean game, but it works with much lesser cuts of beef. I can take unmarbled, tough, beef and turn it into something that if your eyes were closed, you'd swear was the best beef fillet. I do that regularly with lesser cuts of roast so that I can get roast beef cold cuts that I can eat w/o sodium. It also gives me the option to spice it up as I wish. The last batch of roast beef cost us $3.49/lb. If it wasn't tender and delicious I wouldn't bother, but it is. It's not the same size as a commercial cold cut roast beef, but so what? Mine has the flavor I want and it's low sodium. The same product (or similar product) can't be purchased at the deli. Lately if I want sandwich innards I need to make them myself. Chicken salad gets me chicken stock for other uses after the braise. Rare roast beef gets me stock as well in the form of bag juices. As of yet I haven't SVed fish or shrimp. But SVed shrimp in the shells should give an outstanding stock and so would fish pieces SV for the stock. I bet perfectly done SV salmon would be to kill for. No need to torch, just have a great sauce. I need to stop this. Big Grin

If you do a search for Sous Vide machines or controllers you'll turn up all sorts. I was a part of the Sansaire funding and that's what I still use. It works fine but there are smaller and maybe better priced units today.
24 hour London Broil in the meat jacuzzi as we speak.[Image: 9dce25ed58bfde555b814aa2d4e6ec5a.jpg]
#14

Merchant
Central Maine
(This post was last modified: 03-14-2019, 05:01 PM by ShadowsDad.)
Yesterday I cooked up a storm. Cherry Sorbet, Mini Pibi sauce ( a recipe converted from the Yucatan), and Potato/Leek soup. Everything as heart healthy as I could make them. The Mini Pibis are supposed to use Masa with lard. I'm skipping that, maybe I'll serve it over Polenta. The P/L soup is totally free of added sodium and has only a minor amount of EVOO for oil, and it's fairly high fiber.
Brian. Lover of SE razors. Maker of Krampert's Finest Products.
#15

Member
West Coast USA
ShadowsDad, try chimichurri as a sauce. I'm not sure whether the salt is needed, but I suppose Nu Salt should do the trick.
#16

Merchant
Central Maine
(This post was last modified: 03-15-2019, 05:25 AM by ShadowsDad.)
I called it a sauce, but in fact it's the major requirement in the mini pibis. Using chimichurri would give me a meal of sauce over masa/lard (which I can't/won't eat). Much less than desirable or edible IMO and not close to the Yucutacan version of what I wanted to make. I don't want chimichurri over rice, one can't live on that for an entree.

To understand what it is, it's basically puerco pibil but made with chicken, not pork. No banana leaves either since I can't find them.

I had to bastardize the recipe greatly to come up with what I made. No masa, no banana leaves, just the chicken sauce over whatever. The achiote paste was my one concession that I wasn't going to do without since it was critical this first time, despite the sodium. I figured I could just use less of a serving. If I make it again I can use annato powder or grind my own annato seeds.

https://patijinich.com/mini-pibis/

If the bastardized recipe doesn't work the dogs will love it even if we don't. The flavor profile is completely foreign to my taste buds. Not bad, just totally different. Today's cooking is totally different from what I've been doing that landed me where I am today. I'm looking for flavor that my body can tolerate. I've had many successes and a bunch of failures. I'm learning.

I still haven't tried any recipes from the "Food over 50" website. I need to do so.
Brian. Lover of SE razors. Maker of Krampert's Finest Products.


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