#1

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
Alright...this might be rushing things a bit, but Im ttying to get a firm grasp on things before wasting money, so please bear with me...

I started shaving my head using DE razors in mid November, 2015. It took about 5 shaves for me to get a decent shave without blood. After 2 weeks I was getting consistently good shaves, with some irritation. Fast forward, and I now routinely and consistently get DFS or BBS with zero irritation, and the only time I get a nick is when I forget about one of my scars or a mole.

I feel like I have a pretty good handle on the DE razor...I can use any DE in my collection with just about any blade that isnt carbon steel, and get a good shave.

So Im starting to do my research to take the next step. I want to be able to shave my head with a straight. However...I really like my ears where they are.

So...educate me. What is the best way to get started? Should I get a straight and start practicing on my legs? Should I get a shavette and practice on my legs? Shaving my face is not an option. It is simply out of the question.

The other thing I need to consider is honing and maintenance. There is no one near me that can teach me the ropes of maintaining a straight. I have been known to put a mean edge on a knife, but knives are different than razors, and I dont want to invest a lot of money to screw something up.

So...where do I start? Ive read through the forums here and there, and Ive watched some videos, but there is so much information, and much of it is contradictory, that I am starting to feel overwhelmed. Its enough to make me say screw it and give up.

So educate me, please, on an efficient and safe way to learn the arts...

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-Chris~Head Shaver~
#2
Hello. First I would council going slow and thoughtful as it seems you already are Smile

Next it can be as easy or complicated as you like

As far as strops go buy something in the 50 dollars or less if you can find it .not hard to do.
You need a,either a two piece strop ( leather plus linen ) or two single piece strops. I advise buying a 2-1/2 inches wide or wider and a stropping surface of at least 14 inches long or longer.

Razors,well that is debated ,however you could buy a simple Gold Dollar that has been modified and honed for a starter razor or find a reputable restorer of vintage razors. Or buy a brand new basic model usually around 125 and up unless on sale.

Hones.you could buy a nice bevel setter such as a chosera 1,000 grit or a Shapton 1500 grit for chip removal and then but 3m lapping film from amazon the (aluminum oxide type) and buy a glass cutting board at Walmart to use as a base for the film.

Also to lap your stones you can go many ways.
I use either a,DMT8C or a granite floor tile with a bit of water and 400 grit silicone carbide loose grit on it to lap my stones.

If you want more advice or options please either tag me here or pm me here.Smile


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#3

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
(02-17-2016, 02:54 AM)caleb31 Wrote: Hello. First I would council going slow and thoughtful as it seems you already are Smile

Next it can be as easy or complicated as you like

As far as strops go buy something in the 50 dollars or less if you can find it .not hard to do.
You need a,either a two piece strop ( leather plus linen ) or two single piece strops. I advise buying a 2-1/2 inches wide or wider and a stropping surface of at least 14 inches long or longer.

Razors,well that is debated ,however you could buy a simple Gold Dollar that has been modified and honed for a starter razor or find a reputable restorer of vintage razors. Or buy a brand new basic model usually around 125 and up unless on sale.

Hones.you could buy a nice bevel setter such as a chosera 1,000 grit or a Shapton 1500 grit for chip removal and then but 3m lapping film from amazon the (aluminum oxide type) and buy a glass cutting board at Walmart to use as a base for the film.

Also to lap your stones you can go many ways.
I use either a,DMT8C or a granite floor tile with a bit of water and 400 grit silicone carbide loose grit on it to lap my stones.

If you want more advice or options please either tag me here or pm me here.Smile


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It seems you would advocate starting with an inexpensive straight versus a shavette. That does seem to be a fair consensus from my readings...

My oy issue with that is the required maintenance of a straight becomes an immediate necessity, rather than a luxury to be persued over time...

Thankbyou so much for your input. Would you recommend getting 2 straights, one with a shave ready edge and one for practicing honing? Or would that be a waste in your opinion?

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-Chris~Head Shaver~
#4
(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016, 03:16 AM by caleb31.)
(02-17-2016, 03:03 AM)BadDad Wrote:
(02-17-2016, 02:54 AM)caleb31 Wrote: Hello. First I would council going slow and thoughtful as it seems you already are Smile

Next it can be as easy or complicated as you like

As far as strops go buy something in the 50 dollars or less if you can find it .not hard to do.
You need ,either a two piece strop ( leather plus linen ) or two single piece strops. I advise buying a 2-1/2 inches wide or wider and a stropping surface of at least 14 inches long or longer.

Razors,well that is debated ,however you could buy a simple Gold Dollar that has been modified and honed for a starter razor or find a reputable restorer of vintage razors. Or buy a brand new basic model usually around 125 and up unless on sale.

Hones.you could buy a nice bevel setter such as a chosera 1,000 grit or a Shapton 1500 grit for chip removal and then but 3m lapping film from amazon the (aluminum oxide type) and buy a glass cutting board at Walmart to use as a base for the film.

Also to lap your stones you can go many ways.
I use either a,DMT8C or a granite floor tile with a bit of water and 400 grit silicone carbide loose grit on it to lap my stones.

If you want more advice or options please either tag me here or pm me here.Smile


Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
It seems you would advocate starting with an inexpensive straight versus a shavette. That does seem to be a fair consensus from my readings...

My oy issue with that is the required maintenance of a straight becomes an immediate necessity, rather than a luxury to be persued over time...

Thankbyou so much for your input. Would you recommend getting 2 straights, one with a shave ready edge and one for practicing honing? Or would that be a waste in your opinion?

Sent from my LGL34C using Tapatalk
Two will let you have a bit of time if you let others hone them periodically.
As for honing you could also hone in what American shavers call the European manner.
Buy a 1,000 grit and a 3or 4,000 grit stone and then buy a plain untreated leather paddle strop and paste one side with either dovo or Linder red paste and the other side in the dovo/linder black paste.
Pastes are quick,easy and dependable until the honing bug bites you and you decide to go with stones possibly later on Smile

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#5

Member
Lethbridge, Alberta
The easiest way to learn would simply be (at least in my opinion), getting a shave ready razor in your price range, an inexpensive strop or board strop, and them getting a chromox coated piece of balsa wood for touching up your razor eventually. The maintenance itself is really not much of a time suck. Dry and oil between shaves, strop, and occasionally touch up.

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Live well, shave well

www.canadianbladeco.com
#6

Member
Castro Valley,CA
Seems you're getting an lot thrown at you here. I'd recommend getting two shave ready razors so that you have one to use if the other is out for honing. If that's not in your price range get one. It's enough trying to figure out what razor you would like to start with. There is no reason to worry about hones at this point. Get shave roady razors or vintage razors and have them professionally honed. Learn to strop and use them and worry about hones and pastes a little further down the road. I wouldn't rule out using a shavette either. They're very similar, inexpensive and there's no maintenance. The trade off is that you don't quite get the smooth refined edge of a properly honed traditional straight. I love my straights, but I can get a DFS from a Parker SR1 shavette too.

As far as where to start? If you're going to shave your head, start there. I shave my head on occasion and the sides are the easiest part. Start by just doing the sides WTG with the straight and finish up with the DE. As you get more comfortable with it, do more with the straight and less with the DE. Remember that a flatter angle is going to be milder and cause less cuts and irritation. A lot of new guys tear themselves up using angles that are too aggressive. Once you learn to use the correct angle and pressure(very little), a straight is a very gentle tool.

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#7

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
Thanks for all the replies. I think I may just jump in, and give it a shot. I can always PIF or re-sell if I don't enjoy it or end up 1 ear short of a set...
-Chris~Head Shaver~
#8

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
(02-21-2016, 10:55 PM)BadDad Wrote: Thanks for all the replies. I think I may just jump in, and give it a shot. I can always PIF or re-sell if I don't enjoy it or end up 1 ear short of a set...

Sorry, Chris, but that's not permitted.  What would you hang that fabulous beard onto?  Winking

BadDad likes this post
#9
(02-22-2016, 12:06 AM)Freddy Wrote: Sorry, Chris, but that's not permitted.  What would you hang that fabulous beard onto?  Winking

Big Grin
Celestino
Love, Laughter & Shaving  Heart
#10
Hell NO!!! I don't get no razor bumps or ingrowns on my face iffn I shave with anything but a straight. My dome can't take it and I like the Fusion or them yellow and white Bics throaways work. More power to ya brother!!! Hooyeah!!!

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