#1

Member
SE NH
We use honey. Mostly in tea but also to cook with. No matter how fast we use it the honey always seems to crystallize. The honey is still good. It just no longer pours. You need to scoop it out with a spoon. You can put the container in a pot of hot water and the crystals melt until you have liquid honey again. You will need to replenish the hot water until your honey is clear. Alternately you can microwave on a low power but this is chancey. Hot spots in the honey can melt the plastic ontainer.

I had read that 2 teaspoons of corn syrup in 4 oz of honey would prevent this.
I had a bear dispenser that had crystallized. Using the hot water method I turned the honey back into liquid. I added the corn syrup and stirred it in. I just finished that container after 4 weeks and it stayed liquid the whole time. Pretty neat little trick.


 I opened the new container of honey and dispensed some into tea. Then I added in the requisite amount of corn syrup. This will become my new routine, to preemptively add the corn syrup.

Thought I would pass the tip along.

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#2

Member
SE NH
Hey. I posted a thread WIthout a picture. 

Wow. Betcha didn't think I could do that Big Grin
#3

Member
Central Maine
I was unaware of both items. Big Grin

Thanks for the honey tip. When I'm not in ketosis that's what I like to use as sweetener too. I wonder if it will liquefy honey once it's crystalized. I bet I have some to try it on since I haven't used honey in approx' a year.
#4

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
Phil, I love honey and, like you, use it in tea but also as a spread on toast, etc.  What I find about your method is that while it may work, it is no longer pure honey.  My fiend, Pam, has hives and one day when we were chatting I mentioned that I had honey that didn't taste quite right and that I had never had a honey I didn't like before this.  She asked me to look at the jar's ingredients.  I was shocked to see that all it said was something like 100% natural ingredients, though obviously mainly honey.  I had always thought that honey could only be sold as pure.  It seems I was wrong.  To make the honey go further some sellers will add another sweetener like sugar and they can get away with calling it honey.  Inasmuch as corn syrup is a sweetener with a different taste than honey, I'd be reluctant to do what you have done.  That jar of "honey" with natural ingredients went right into the trash.  I was very careful with the next jar I purchased and, sure enough, I was back to pure honey.  Do you find any change in the flavor, even subtle?
#5

Member
SE NH
(05-11-2020, 04:07 PM)Freddy Wrote: Phil, I love honey and, like you, use it in tea but also as a spread on toast, etc.  What I find about your method is that while it may work, it is no longer pure honey.  My fiend, Pam, has hives and one day when we were chatting I mentioned that I had honey that didn't taste quite right and that I had never had a honey I didn't like before this.  She asked me to look at the jar's ingredients.  I was shocked to see that all it said was something like 100% natural ingredients, though obviously mainly honey.  I had always thought that honey could only be sold as pure.  It seems I was wrong.  To make the honey go further some sellers will add another sweetener like sugar and they can get away with calling it honey.  Inasmuch as corn syrup is a sweetener with a different taste than honey, I'd be reluctant to do what you have done.  That jar of "honey" with natural ingredients went right into the trash.  I was very careful with the next jar I purchased and, sure enough, I was back to pure honey.  Do you find any change in the flavor, even subtle?
Freddy i did not know that about honey. Like you, I assumed it was always just 100% honey.

We use honey in tea or baked goods. I rarely eat it straight. Except to lick it off my finger after I  "cleaned up" the bottle of any dribbles.  Smile  

That being said I was curious if this small amount of corb syrup would alter the taste. To my palate there was no difference. ML did not discern one either.

Phil

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#6

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
(05-11-2020, 05:48 PM)PhilNH5 Wrote:
(05-11-2020, 04:07 PM)Freddy Wrote: Phil, I love honey and, like you, use it in tea but also as a spread on toast, etc.  What I find about your method is that while it may work, it is no longer pure honey.  My fiend, Pam, has hives and one day when we were chatting I mentioned that I had honey that didn't taste quite right and that I had never had a honey I didn't like before this.  She asked me to look at the jar's ingredients.  I was shocked to see that all it said was something like 100% natural ingredients, though obviously mainly honey.  I had always thought that honey could only be sold as pure.  It seems I was wrong.  To make the honey go further some sellers will add another sweetener like sugar and they can get away with calling it honey.  Inasmuch as corn syrup is a sweetener with a different taste than honey, I'd be reluctant to do what you have done.  That jar of "honey" with natural ingredients went right into the trash.  I was very careful with the next jar I purchased and, sure enough, I was back to pure honey.  Do you find any change in the flavor, even subtle?
Freddy i did not know that about honey. Like you, I assumed it was always just 100% honey.

We use honey in tea or baked goods. I rarely eat it straight. Except to lick it off my finger after I  "cleaned up" the bottle of any dribbles.  Smile  

That being said I was curious if this small amount of corb syrup would alter the taste. To my palate there was no difference. ML did not discern one either.

Phil

Thanks, Phil. I'll keep that in mind the next time I have honey that crystallizes, which does happen to me from time to time.
#7

Member
Central Maine
Use the water clear corn syrup. There is a dark version that has molasses added to it to simulate the taste of brown sugar.


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