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#1

Brother
East of Indiana
Both Platinum and Iridium are expensive elements.

Since these two are expensive, how can they be put on razor blades?

I shall presume that the amount of the element is very small.

But I still think that I have an interesting question.
44 Sycamore
#2

Member
Austin, TX
(02-15-2016, 04:11 AM)alphege Wrote: Both Platinum and Iridium are expensive elements.

Since these two are expensive, how can they be put on razor blades?

I shall presume that the amount of the element is very small.

But I still think that I have an interesting question.

Hi alphege , although not an expert it is my understanding that if in fact applied, these coatings are applied to the blade edges. I personally think, even in those instances, it has more to do with marketing than shaving.

Good question and perhaps one of our blade experts will chime in with more detail.
Kevin
#3

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
By no means am I an expert. Im not even well informed. But tbats never stopped me from forming an opinion...

I would imagine that the amount of material actually applied to each blade edge could only be measured in micrograms.

My guess would be that thousands of "coated blades" would be needed to even provide a milligram of these prescious metals. Much less, I would guess, than even found on, say, and Iridium spark plug...

That would put the cost per blade in the fractional range for manufacturing, with the benefit of marketing a precious coated blade, allowing an increased selling price.

All of this is purely uninformed conjecture on my part, mind you...

Sent from my LGL34C using Tapatalk
-Chris~Head Shaver~
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#4

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
(02-15-2016, 05:43 PM)BadDad Wrote: By no means am I an expert. Im not even well informed. But tbats never stopped me from forming an opinion...

I would imagine that the amount of material actually applied to each blade edge could only be measured in micrograms.

My guess would be that thousands of "coated blades" would be needed to even provide a milligram of these prescious metals. Much less, I would guess, than even found on, say, and Iridium spark plug...

That would put the cost per blade in the fractional range for manufacturing, with the benefit of marketing a precious coated blade, allowing an increased selling price.

All of this is purely uninformed conjecture on my part, mind you...

Sent from my LGL34C using Tapatalk

It certainly makes a lot of sense, though, Chris.
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#5

Brother
East of Indiana
Thank you (more than one) for attempting to answer my question.

Now here is a follow up.

Iridium is named after the flower' Iris'. Someone should add flame to a used Iridium blade. I guess pretty much flame should be added.

According to the Encyclopedia ( I spelled that right with no book to help!) , more than one color of flame should be given off. It should look quite pretty.

Then a member here should give a report.

I don't have a used blade, so I can't do it myself.
44 Sycamore
#6

Super Moderator
(This post was last modified: 02-15-2016, 08:47 PM by Marko. Edit Reason: typo )
I like the idea of burning a blade. Not as much fun as blowing it up but still fun. I have a Polsilver Super Iridium I'm my razor right now so when its done in a few days I'll put a torch to it and report.

There are plenty of interesting videos on youtube on how razor blades are made. I posted some last week on the blade thread I think but easy to find on your own - search how are razor blades made?

Mark
#7

Member
Austin, TX
Fire good. Video fire, better. Hmm...
Kevin
[+] 2 users like this post
#8
We are talking angstroms here. An angstrom = 10−10 m (one ten-billionth of a metre) or 0.1 nm.

https://www.google.cat/patents/US3743551
A common greeting was 'Well, Gillette, how's the razor?' If I had been technically trained, I would have quit.

King C. Gillette
#9

Super Moderator
(02-15-2016, 09:01 PM)BPman Wrote: We are talking angstroms here. An angstrom = 10−10 m (one ten-billionth of a metre) or 0.1 nm.

https://www.google.cat/patents/US3743551

Well, thats settled. I'm still going to burn itSmile

I think its also possible to use all sorts of terms in the naming of blades without actually saying that there is any of that stuff in the blades themselves. I'm not sure there is any agency that enforces standards in that regard. Like olive oil in North America - no agency to enforce standards on virgin/extra virgin etc.

Mark
#10

Super Moderator
I did some more looking and in addition to being really thin its only on the edges. The amounts will be vanishingly small.
Mark
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