#1

Maker of Soaps and Shaver of Men
Cooperstown, NY, USA
Despite the fact that France is usually regarded as the center of the world’s perfume industry, the Italians have actually been making perfume for even longer than the French. The very first Eau de Cologne (created by the House of Farina) was designed by an Italian immigrant to Germany, a man who came from what was already a rich tradition of making fragrance for the wealthy and powerful of Italy. There are still quite a few great Italian perfume houses, many of which, like Mazzolari, are pretty old.

The House of Mazzolari was founded in 1888 by Augusto Mazzolari, who opened his first cologne shop in Milan (specializing in the creation of “refreshing tonics for the mind and spirit”), which remains open to this day. Their signature fragrance, Mazzolari Eau de Toilette, was created some time during the early days of the House, though its exact date of release is unclear. I get the distinct impression that it’s been updated several times over the last 127 years, but it’s weathered the changes well and really smells pretty damn good.

My initial thought is that I didn’t know what to think. It’s supposed to be a vetiver fragrance, but it doesn’t smell like any vetiver perfume I’ve ever encountered. It’s clean and green and soapy, like a slightly darker Chanel No. 19. There’s a TON of galbanum (a bitter, leathery wood) in it, which makes it smell sharp and clean, and a rich herbal character beneath, which reminds me very much of clary sage. There’s also a peculiar, bread-like quality lurking in the bottom of the fragrance, but it’s only really noticeable if you smell it up close.

As the perfume progresses, it develops a distinct woody, incensey quality, not supremely heavy like Avignon or other rich incense fragrances, but enough to make it interesting. After about 6 hours or so, it eventually bottoms out at a smooth, inoffensive combination of sandalwood and musk, far less interesting than the rest of the perfume, but attractive in a genteel sort of way. Overall, on my skin, it lasts about 8 hours, just enough for a regular work day. Coincidentally, its intense cleanliness makes it a great office or everyday scent, both because you probably won’t offend anyone with it and because you won’t smell like every other aquatic-wearing guy for a 10 mile radius.

About the only drawback to Mazzolari is its pricetag; it clocks in at about $150 per 100 ml, so it’s definitely not cheap. That said, it’s fairly strong and is versatile enough that you could wear it for most occasions, so it’s a decent buy if you’re looking for a signature scent. Not a masterpiece by any means, but really solid work.

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#2

Member
Los Angeles
Very nice, again!

As strange as it sounds, I think it might be right up my weird palate alley Wink

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#3

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
Sounds interesting, Will, but based on your review I would definitely want to sniff before buying.
#4

Maker of Soaps and Shaver of Men
Cooperstown, NY, USA
(06-27-2015, 04:43 AM)Freddy Wrote: Sounds interesting, Will, but based on your review I would definitely want to sniff before buying.

I generally recommend doing that anyway. Smile I'm not really a believer in blind buys.
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#5
Blind buys are rarely a good idea. The way a scent mixes with one persons body chemistry will very widely. The lady at Nordstrom thinks I'm odd I think because I come in and try on a scent and leave. I ware it for the day and if I like it, I go back and buy it. She thinks I should spray it on the cardboard test strips so I can sample a lot of scents. Besides not getting to see how it reacts with my body chemistry, all I would be judging is the Top Notes of a fragrance and not getting the middle or base notes. Has to be the WORST way to judge a fragrance!


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