#1

Merchant
Millbrae - CA
Or does it really matter!

I was watching a video on youtube, one of the guys in the video mentioned that most European soap companies in Europe don’t saponify their soaps but buy Soap Noodles! I promptly jumped on Google and found out few companies who sell this product.

I wonder how many (artisan) soap makers just buy this stuff as a starting point. I’ve even noticed that most of these noodles have identical ingredients to soaps out in the market. I would also imagine that getting this product directly from China by the tons would allow some soap makers to make soaps at extremely low prices.


http://www.tredis.fr/en/produits/4-soap-...oodles.htm

http://www.kappus-seife.de/en/business_service/products

https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na/Perso...ap-Noodles

http://www.cremeroleo.de/en/produktberei...p-Base.php
#2

Soap Slinger
Burnsville, MN
To use those soap noodles you pretty much need access to soap milling equipment. I suppose you could try rebatching it by hand but that would be pretty obnoxious.

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#3

Merchant
Millbrae - CA
I knew a microwave would be good for somethig Wink Rebatching Coconut Soap Noodles Instructions https://youtu.be/2RFUeniFEWI
#4

Chazz Reinhold HOF
I try to keep this lifestyle/hobby as simple and stupid as possible, lol. When I buy a soap from an artisan, I am trusting they know what they are doing :-) And I only buy from artisans I trust from prior business.

Interesting thread nevertheless!

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#5

Merchant
Millbrae - CA
(This post was last modified: 12-30-2015, 10:04 PM by GroomingDept.)
I didn't create this thread to be accusatory or finger pointing or name calling, or implying a vendor is dishonest by doing this!

I think this process makes sense for many of the large brands and large soap companies which outsource their soaps to be made by someone else! I would also think this method would be helpful for European soap makers, since material certification is costly and elaborate.
#6

Chazz Reinhold HOF
(12-30-2015, 10:02 PM)GroomingDept Wrote: I didn't create this thread to be accusatory or finger pointing or name calling, or implying a vendor is dishonest by doing this!

I think this process makes sense for many of the large brands and large soap companies which outsource their soaps to be made by someone else! I would also think this method would be helpful for European soap makers, since material certification is costly and elaborate.

Didn't take it that way :-)

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#7
Mine is.

All evidence has been buried. All tapes have been erased.

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#8

Member
Los Angeles
To me, using noodles would be much more space and equipment consuming. I know a few artisans in Europe AND North America that use this type of soap making, they would not deny it, if asked.

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#9

Member
Sydney, Australia
(12-30-2015, 09:07 PM)GroomingDept Wrote: I’ve even noticed that most of these noodles have identical ingredients to soaps out in the market.

Mmm, just bear in mind that the ingredients list is probably not going to be a very good guide since the proportions of those ingredients make a huge difference in the end result.
#10

Vintage Razor Fan
Southwestern NY
Interesting, but I'm pretty confident that the artisan soaps that I use are just that, artisan. The artisan soap makers I buy from are very passionate about their craft and I can't imagine that they would endanger their reputation by taking shortcuts.(if in fact this would be a shortcut for them). I've had direct communication with several artisans and the passion/obsession they have leads me to believe what it means to them. The shaving soap these artisans produce means the world to them IMHO. They take great pride in what they create.

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-Rob


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