#1
Anyone just want some simple scents? Seems like there are so many overly complicated scents, that you can't get a feel for what they'll be like by reading the scent notes.

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#2

Mike Distress
New Jersey
(04-17-2024, 02:51 AM)Nero Wrote: Anyone just want some simple scents? Seems like there are so many overly complicated scents, that you can't get a feel for what they'll be like by reading the scent notes.

I feel what you're saying. Sometimes it's really hard to decide to pick up a scent that has so many notes in it. I'll read the description and I'll see a lot of things that I do like, but I have no idea how the overall scent is with all the other notes in it. I will say, one that I have that I really love is one of those, what you call overly complicated scents. I was looking at it, asking myself, "are these notes necessary? If just one or two of them disappeared would it really affect the overall fragrance?" My guess is it would have to, because it wouldn't have made sense to put them in otherwise. And sometimes a simple scent, even a single note, can turn out to not smell like you think it's supposed to. It's all really a gamble.

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integritas pietas fortitudinem
#3
(04-17-2024, 02:58 AM)metal_shavings Wrote:
(04-17-2024, 02:51 AM)Nero Wrote: Anyone just want some simple scents? Seems like there are so many overly complicated scents, that you can't get a feel for what they'll be like by reading the scent notes.

I feel what you're saying. Sometimes it's really hard to decide to pick up a scent that has so many notes in it. I'll read the description and I'll see a lot of things that I do like, but I have no idea how the overall scent is with all the other notes in it. I will say, one that I have that I really love is one of those, what you call overly complicated scents. I was looking at it, asking myself, "are these notes necessary? If just one or two of them disappeared would it really affect the overall fragrance?" My guess is it would have to, because it wouldn't have made sense to put them in otherwise. And sometimes a simple scent, even a single note, can turn out to not smell like you think it's supposed to. It's all really a gamble.

I agree, definitely a gamble. It can pay off. Some of my favorites are complicated. But it's so hard to know what you're getting when you're reading 10-15 or even more scent notes from all over the map.

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#4

Member
Chicago Suburbs
(This post was last modified: 04-17-2024, 12:13 PM by RayClem. Edited 1 time in total.)
It is all a matter of preference. There are simple scents and there are complex, perfume-type scents. Use whichever suits you best.

Personally, I dislike simple scents. There are a number of scents that I love to smell, but which irritate my skin. Some examples are: lime, lemon, grapefruit, mint, menthol, cinnamon, clove, and pepper. These scent notes are commonly used in simple scents. If I try to use one of these soaps, I get severe irritation. However, if I use a soap whose scent contains a dozen or more scent notes, non e of the individual scents are concentrated enough to cause irritation.

A wine taster will take a sip of wine and try to discern all the various scent notes that it provides. Likewise, I try to sniff a soap and detect as many scent notes as possible. Some scents are so well blended that it is impossible to pick out any specific notes. There are a few scents I have purchased that I do not like, but over time, I have gained experience in looking at scent notes and determining whether a scent will agree with both my nose and my skin. Sometimes, a scent will list scent accords rather than individual scent notes. That makes it more difficult in ascertaining the aroma. For example, if a scent lists citrus accord, does that accord contain lime, lemon and grapefruit, which I cannot use or does it contain bergamot, orange, mandarin, and neroli, which I love.

I absolutely despise scent descriptions that are described poetically. Does anyone really know what is meant by: "a walk through a meadow on a spring morning". I would much rather see scent notes. I avoid purchasing any soaps that do not list specific scents.

Grooming Dept/Aion Skincare will soon release three new shaving soaps exclusive to The Razor Company.

They are:
Liberté- Lemon, bergamot, lavender, galbanum, pepper, tarragon, violet, rose, leather, olibanum, patchouli.

Ceremony- Blood orange, orange blossom, peach, apricot, vanilla, tuberose, cedarwood, vetiver.

Solhaven- Lime, jasmine, mandarin, gardenia, coconut, ambergris, sandalwood.

Liberté is focused on lemon and Solhaven is focused on lime. Thus, I would not choose them based on my skin sensitivity. However, for those whose skin is not so sensitive, the scents might be wonderful. Personally, I am also not a fan of the gardenia and coconut scents in Solhaven. The Ceremony is based on scents that I like and that do not irritate my skin. Thus, if I were to pick one, that would be the one for me.

If you cook, do you use a simple salt, pepper and garlic seasoning, or are you more likely to reach for something more complex?

Although I do keep a container of SPG in the cupboard, I rarely reach for it. I am far more likely to choose Montreal Steak Seasoning, Cavender's Greek Seasoning, Old Bay Seafood Seasoning, Lawry's Chicken and Poultry Rub, Lawry's Seasoned Salt, McCormick's Salmon Seasoning, Italian Herb Blend, Chinese Five Spice blend, Garam Masala or various other herbs, spices and seasoning in the cupboard. I love the complexity of taste and aroma provided by these complex blends. If using individual herbs or spices, I usually combine several.

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#5

Member
Chester County, PA
(This post was last modified: 04-17-2024, 12:27 PM by dtownvino. Edited 1 time in total.)
I think Tonka Bean is a great scent.  

I also enjoy Bay Rum.  

Some citrus is nice in the summer.  

I am fatigued looking for scents and am more or less staying with what I know and like.

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#6
I'm with the OP. Simple is best for me. I do have some fav's that are not simple but in my case I haul and play with Gasoline all day. My nose is not that great any more. I like strong and simple so I can smell it to start with. I have 6 or 8 soaps that perform great, I just cant really smell them after about a minute.

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From the shade of the big mountain, Pike's Peak.
Jerry...
#7

Posting Freak
Peachtree City, GA
(This post was last modified: 04-17-2024, 05:35 PM by DanLaw. Edited 1 time in total.)
Been suggesting soap makers stop pretending to be perfumers for years. Usually they aren't very good at it and, even when they are, really, it's just soap.

Much as with a home, auto or even clothes: simple yet high quality constituents executed properly with timeless style is best.

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#8
I might agree, less is more sometimes .
Not many years ago we had the opposite problem.
Today many artisan are forced to release a new base and a new fragrance every month for many reason .
But for me it's not a problem, I like the market today .
Btw performance first , always !
If the scent is good too, even better

This is not my language so I apologize in advance for any errors . Thks


Inviato dal mio iPhone utilizzando Tapatalk

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#9
I have had similar thoughts (and preferences) for some time, to the point where I really wonder if I even fit in on shave forums like this. I tend to gravitate to time honored mass market scents/products primarily because they are simple, often punch way above their price in terms of performance, and are approachable. So I like Cella, almost anything by Pinaud, Floid, LEA, Seaforth! (original product when it was around), Williams A/V, etc. I think that Fine made an excellent triple milled soap (old formula) and they do a great job with fragrances (copies of classics)

I hate to say this because I don't want to disparage anybody else's tastes/hobby etc. but I am extremely disappointed with so called "artisan" products. They are way too expensive compared to the above and don't function much better, some not as well. Many of the fragrances are, frankly, silly and sometimes way over cooked. The only time I have ever (and by more than one person) been asked to not wear an aftershave was a "artisan" A/S from a respected company. So, I tend to fall back on the classics, and feel out of place when everybody else is using super fancy, expensive stuff.

Having said that, I do enjoy (vicariously) the pleasure you folks get out of using and experimenting with these products.

I just don't seem to get there myself.

Oh, and I hate Old Spice.......go figure.

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#10
(04-17-2024, 05:33 PM)DanLaw Wrote: really, it's just soap.

Artisans wont sell much soap if they don't feed the market with new and interesting stuff. You probably see B&M retiring some of their catalogue- simple soaps like Lavender and Cool. The new and seasonal stuff sells while the "regulars" collect dust and take up valuable space on the shelves. Product sitting there is essentially money lost. I think it's a good thing when they try something different but still aligns with their business model. It keeps the market fresh and interesting.  It's not for everyone. Helps to know what you don't like so much ( in my case I hate patchouli, rose, and incense) so I tend to avoid those but I'm mostly open to trying new things. There are plenty of cans of Barbasol, Gillette gunk, Proraso etc at your local grocery and drug store for those that just want a good shave and know how to do it.

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