#1
(This post was last modified: 09-07-2020, 03:54 PM by frenchy. Edited 2 times in total.)
Just acquired a new high quality badger brush. How long does ot take to break them in? My first couple of shaves it was quite difficult to get a good lather. I face lather for the most part. Any hints would be welcome as well. Thanks!
#2

Member
Peachtree City, GA
(This post was last modified: 09-07-2020, 08:47 PM by DanLaw. Edited 2 times in total.)
My procedure is to thoroughly clean a new brush with gentle animal shampoo then vinegar water soak followed by a thorough rinse and dry. Immediately upon drying, lather, rinse and relather allowing to sit in lathered soap overnight.  Rinse thoroughly next morning then set aside to dry for 2-3 days

Have found they all have lathered easily after that although most improve further over next 10 uses or so depending on brush knot. Be sure to allow the badger to dry between shaves - at least 2 days. Store in dry, shaded cool area

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Just an old slow fat man
#3
(This post was last modified: 09-07-2020, 08:21 PM by Kehole.)
All depends on the batch of hair. Some are pleasant right away. Some take 15 lathers. Some hog lather early on, others do it constantly. Depends on knot density etc.

If you’re coming from synthetic knots you’ll certainly need to start loading more heavily

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#4

Posting Freak
Canada
(This post was last modified: 09-07-2020, 11:15 PM by celestino. Edited 1 time in total.)
(09-07-2020, 08:20 PM)Kehole Wrote: All depends on the batch of hair. Some are pleasant right away. Some take 15 lathers. Some hog lather early on, others do it constantly. Depends on knot density etc.

If you’re coming from synthetic knots you’ll certainly need to start loading more heavily

+1
It also may depend on the size of the knot; the denser the knot, the longer it may take, for some hair types.
As mentioned above, you may need to load more soap if you are using a badger brush.
What brushes had you been using prior?

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Celestino
Love, Laughter & Shaving  Heart
#5

Golf Nut
San Antonio, Texas
I think either i have been very lucky or its the normal, but badger brushes have not changed that significantly for me (new vs 20 uses). I have heard stories of some brushes completely changing with use, but in my opinion the real differences are minimal and more about feel.

I dont think they can go from 1 to 10, with break in.

But they could get from a 7 to an 8 or at most, a 9 (on extreme cases when it changes a lot after break up). Moral of the story is, the change is not as big as you might have heard, a point or 2 in the ratings scale at most, not anything like 4-5 points difference).

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#6
(09-07-2020, 11:14 PM)celestino Wrote:
(09-07-2020, 08:20 PM)Kehole Wrote: All depends on the batch of hair. Some are pleasant right away. Some take 15 lathers. Some hog lather early on, others do it constantly. Depends on knot density etc.

If you’re coming from synthetic knots you’ll certainly need to start loading more heavily

+1
It also may depend on the size of the knot; the denser the knot, the longer it may take, for some hair types.
As mentioned above, you may need to load more soap if you are using a badger brush.
What brushes had you been using prior?

A cheap Frank’s badger from China..Not dense..
#7

Merchant
MD Eastern Shore
(09-07-2020, 11:14 PM)celestino Wrote:
(09-07-2020, 08:20 PM)Kehole Wrote: All depends on the batch of hair. Some are pleasant right away. Some take 15 lathers. Some hog lather early on, others do it constantly. Depends on knot density etc.

If you’re coming from synthetic knots you’ll certainly need to start loading more heavily

+1
It also may depend on the size of the knot; the denser the knot, the longer it may take, for some hair types.
As mentioned above, you may need to load more soap if you are using a badger brush.
What brushes had you been using prior?

I'll second these gentlemen's observations.  Hair characteristics, knot density, the amount of loft, even the way the knot is tied/glued--all come into play.  ("Quality," of course, is in the eye of the beholder.  So, I'm going to assume you're talking about one of the more expensive brushes.  Please correct me if I'm wrong.)  

With that understanding, some badger knots perform marvelously from the start while others need fifteen to as many as thirty shaves (not necessarily lathering's) before coming into their own.  I'll also argue that most high-end badgers--even those that perform well from the outset--tend to "improve" with use.  

All this is to suggest that patience can be a virtue. Your brush might never break-in to become one you enjoy (in which case, you might consider selling it). But on the other hand, you could have a gem just waiting to be revealed.

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Brad
#8

Super Moderator
If it’s a Shavemac D01 2 band, forever.

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#9
(09-08-2020, 02:51 PM)ESBrushmaker Wrote:
(09-07-2020, 11:14 PM)celestino Wrote:
(09-07-2020, 08:20 PM)Kehole Wrote: All depends on the batch of hair. Some are pleasant right away. Some take 15 lathers. Some hog lather early on, others do it constantly. Depends on knot density etc.

If you’re coming from synthetic knots you’ll certainly need to start loading more heavily

+1
It also may depend on the size of the knot; the denser the knot, the longer it may take, for some hair types.
As mentioned above, you may need to load more soap if you are using a badger brush.
What brushes had you been using prior?

I'll second these gentlemen's observations.  Hair characteristics, knot density, the amount of loft, even the way the knot is tied/glued--all come into play.  ("Quality," of course, is in the eye of the beholder.  So, I'm going to assume you're talking about one of the more expensive brushes.  Please correct me if I'm wrong.)  

With that understanding, some badger knots perform marvelously from the start while others need fifteen to as many as thirty shaves (not necessarily lathering's) before coming into their own.  I'll also argue that most high-end badgers--even those that perform well from the outset--tend to "improve" with use.  

All this is to suggest that patience can be a virtue. Your brush might never break-in to become one you enjoy (in which case, you might consider selling it). But on the other hand, you could have a gem just waiting to be revealed.


He mentioned a frank shaving brush so I don’t have a lot of faith that it’ll break in but who knows.
#10
(09-08-2020, 03:23 PM)Kehole Wrote:
(09-08-2020, 02:51 PM)ESBrushmaker Wrote:
(09-07-2020, 11:14 PM)celestino Wrote: +1
It also may depend on the size of the knot; the denser the knot, the longer it may take, for some hair types.
As mentioned above, you may need to load more soap if you are using a badger brush.
What brushes had you been using prior?

I'll second these gentlemen's observations.  Hair characteristics, knot density, the amount of loft, even the way the knot is tied/glued--all come into play.  ("Quality," of course, is in the eye of the beholder.  So, I'm going to assume you're talking about one of the more expensive brushes.  Please correct me if I'm wrong.)  

With that understanding, some badger knots perform marvelously from the start while others need fifteen to as many as thirty shaves (not necessarily lathering's) before coming into their own.  I'll also argue that most high-end badgers--even those that perform well from the outset--tend to "improve" with use.  

All this is to suggest that patience can be a virtue. Your brush might never break-in to become one you enjoy (in which case, you might consider selling it). But on the other hand, you could have a gem just waiting to be revealed.


He mentioned a frank shaving brush so I don’t have a lot of faith that it’ll break in but who knows.

Frank’s is the old brush..not the new..


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