#1

Vintage Shaver
Seattle, WA
It's been quite a while since I bought eyeglass lenses, and the last time I purchased directly from my eye doctor. I now have a new prescription from a doctor who does not sell glasses, so I need to buy lenses to fit my current frame from a retailer. I want to go to a walk-in store rather than getting the lenses online. Fairly near to where I live are Lenscrafters, America's Best, Sears Optical, and Pearle Vision. Has anyone had experience with one or more of these stores, and if so, what are your recommendations?
Thanks!
John
#2
Avoid avoid avoid.

Find yourself an independent guy. I'm sure they will be happy to fill your prescription even if you didn't see their doctor.

I've been wearing glasses since I was 5 years old and always had bad luck with the big chain guys. You can get a superior product and better advice from your local guys

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-Spencer
#3

Vintage Shaver
Seattle, WA
I went to a small local shop to get the lenses, which will be ready tomorrow (2-day service). The progressive lenses cost about twice as much as they would have at Lenscrafters and 3 times as much as ordering online. But I like the idea of supporting a local business and being able to go back to it easily if there is a problem.

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John
#4

Member
Surrey, UK
(07-27-2016, 04:35 AM)churchilllafemme Wrote: I went to a small local shop to get the lenses, which will be ready tomorrow (2-day service). The progressive lenses cost about twice as much as they would have at Lenscrafters and 3 times as much as ordering online. But I like the idea of supporting a local business and being able to go back to it easily if there is a problem.

John, varifocal (progressive) lenses come in varying degrees of quality and it's important to compare like with like when it comes down to pricing variation, as with many things. The main difference between the manufacturers and the range of lenses each offers, is the field of vision available when looking at distance, intermediate and near. The narrower the field of vision in each area of the lens, the more peripheral distortion and the more you'll need to turn the head in the direction you want to look, rather than just glancing. The more expensive lenses, such as those from Carl Zeiss, offer the closest to natural vision, with a wide peripheral field of view and very minimal distortion at all ranges.

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David
#5

Vintage Shaver
Seattle, WA
Well, my recent annual eye exam showed a significant change in my prescription (worsening vision), so it was time again for new glasses.  I had discovered finally that AARP members get a 30% discount on complete glasses (frames + lenses) at Lenscrafters, so this time I went there today and ordered progressive trifocals with transition (light-to-dark) lenses plus a one-year warranty (since I'm getting more prone to damaging such possessions with each passing year).  They were pricey, but with the discount not a whole lot more than I paid last year at my closer local independent eyeglasses shop for plain progressives.  And in less than three hours I got an email saying they were ready. I drove the 12 minutes back to the mall Lenscrafters, and now I'm wearing them. I was quite impressed with the service.

Matsilainen likes this post
John
#6
We've had really good experiences with Smartbuyglasses online, great customer service.
#7
My problem with the big chain guys is that unless you're getting an exotic prescription (eg multi-focal lenses) they always seem to push polycarbonate lenses.

I frigging HATE poly carb.
-Spencer
#8

Super Moderator
Another factor to consider is whether you actually get the lens brand you pay for. A place I used to get my glasses from pulled one over on me with the old switcheroo. I selected and paid for Nikon high index lenses. A couple of years later I was having an arm replaced on the glasses and the technician gouged one of the lenses. They said not to worry, they would replace the lens so I said make sure its a Nikon lens. They asked why and I said because the originals were Nikon, they said no they're not they're the budget lenses. I said thats interesting because I selected and paid for Nikon lenses. We had words and I've taken my business elsewhere. Funny thing is, I'd been using Nikon lenses for several years and they had a Nikon brand etched on the lens - you couldn't see it unless the lens was fogged. When I got this new pair I breathed on the lens and there was no Nikon on them so I asked where it was and the technician assured me they were Nikon and that they were no longer doing that. I trusted them. The Nikon lenses are significantly more expensive and, I believe better quality.
#9

Vintage Shaver
Seattle, WA
Even if they are honest, the techs/sales people don't always know what they are talking about. This time I was told that the Transitions photochromic lenses I was getting did not darken inside a car even on a very sunny day because they needed direct UV light to change. I asked if there were any that did darken inside a car, and he said no, not that he knew of. Well, when I got home, 5 minutes of research on the internet disclosed that there are indeed lenses that darken in a car, and they are even sold under the same Transitions brand name.
John
#10

Vintage Shaver
Seattle, WA
Latest update: I had a routine "annual" eye exam today, and the doctor said that not only had my vision changed somewhat from the last time, but also my current eyeglasses from Lenscrafters had been manufactured incorrectly, so that my eyes were "fighting" the lenses constantly. After he allowed my eyes to relax without my glasses for 10 minutes, the illuminated eye chart, seen through his equipment set according to his measurements of my glasses, looked really blurry. He strongly recommended I take my new prescription back to the small local shop that I used 3 years ago because he said their optician is highly skilled and experienced, much more so that those at the large chain stores. So I followed his advice, and now I'm waiting a week for my new glasses. They are quite expensive (progressive/transition lenses), but I think that perhaps I can be more confident that they'll be done right. And as I get older, I'm appreciating good vision more and more.

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John


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