#1

Posting Freak
Does anyone blend their own fragrance?  I stumbled across this list today. I know that dupes/homages are a big part of wet shaving because let’s be honest, fragrance is hard and the average artisan is not up to the task. I know you can hire experts to help but that costs so dupes and homages become a go to. I knew all that but I was still surprised at how extensive this list is. 

https://www.thirstybadger.ca/shaving-fragrance-homage/

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#2

Veni, vidi, vici
Vault 111
This is invaluable, Marko. I already have it book marked. Thank you.

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~~~~
Primo
Shaving since 1971; enjoying my shaves since 2014
A che bel vivere, che bel piacere, per un barbiere di qualità! Happy2
#3

Merchant
St. Louis, MO
Sir Henry insists on blending his own.

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Shave Sharp, Look Sharp
#4
(This post was last modified: 05-08-2023, 02:31 AM by jeffm54321.)
(05-07-2023, 11:52 PM)dominicr Wrote: Sir Henry insists on blending his own.

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What? What is this?

https://www.sirhenryssundries.com/drake/

"Drake is inspired by (not affiliated with) Drakkar Noir."

And this

https://www.sirhenryssundries.com/sandalwood/

"Introducing Sandalwood. Sandalwood is inspired by (not affiliated with) AOS Sandalwood."

And of course, 

https://www.sirhenryssundries.com/avenue/

"Avenue is inspired by (not affiliated with) Creed Aventus."

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#5

Member
Chicago Suburbs
(This post was last modified: 05-09-2023, 12:46 PM by RayClem.)
Marko is correct that many artisan soapmakers do not have the skill in perfumery to develop their own scents, but there are those who do.

While I do have some dupes in my collection, some are cheap, inferior fragrances made with fragrance chemicals rather than essential oils and absolutes. For example, the aroma of vanilla can be provided by soaking expensive Madagascar vanilla beans in a solution of water and alcohol. The aroma of ethyl vanillin, a synthetic fragrance is similar to vanilla, but since it is derived from petroleum, it is far less expensive. Ethyl vanillin smells simimlar to natural vanilla, the aroma is not nearly as complex.

Inexpensive soaps like Arko often contain fragrances such as Amyl Cinnamal , Citronellol , Geraniol , Hexyl Cinnamal, and Linalool. While each of these chemicals is found naturally, the versions used are usually derived synthetically. They can often trigger allergic reactions. I cannot use Arko for this reason, but have no idea which ingredient is triggering my reaction.

There are companies who purchase famous fragrances, analyze them using gas chromatography and then figure out how to produce a similar fragrance using inexpensive ingredients. They can be sold at a fraction of the cost of the original. A soapmaker can purchase the fragrances and add them to their soap formula to make them smell similar to the famous fragrance.

There are also those who will purchase a famous fragrance, analyze it with their own nose and then try to replicate that scent by mixing various fragrances. These are the fragrances that will generally be sold as "inspired by" fragrances. The quality of the fragrance will depend upon the skill of the perfumer, the sensitivity of the nose, and the quality of the fragrance ingredients used. Thus, they can range widely in quality.

Many soapmakers are good at developing soap formulations, but collaborate with skilled perfumers to develop scents. Because the ingredient used to product soaps have a scent of their own, just adding a pre-made scent to a soap formula will not necessarily provide a great aroma. That is why collaboration is needed between the perfumer and soap maker. The perfumer will adjust the scent to accommodate the scent of the soap.

Then there are those artisans who develop their own fragrances. Again, they can vary widely in quality. Depending on the skill and preferences on the artisan, you might or might not like the fragrances. For example, I like the Barrister and Mann Omnibus soap formulation, but I am not a fan of Will's scents, but there are exceptions like Passiflora that Will describes as an elegant, sophisticated, spicy fougère. His description is fitting.

I have collected well over 200 shaving soaps over the past 10 year. Some of the fragrances were disgusting to my nose. Some were acceptable. Others were exquisite. Over time, my nose has learned to appreciate complex fragrances, well blended from high quality ingredients. I only add new soaps to my collection now if I am confident that the performance and the fragrance will both be outstanding.

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#6
(This post was last modified: 05-09-2023, 12:09 AM by jeffm54321.)
(05-08-2023, 03:53 PM)RayClem Wrote: Marko is correct that many artisan soapmakers do not have the skill in perfumery  to develop their own scents, but there are those who do.

While I do have some dupes in my collection, some are cheap, inferior fragrances made with fragrance chemicals rather than  essential oils and absolutes. For example, the aroma of vanilla can be provided by soaking expensive Madagascar vanilla beans in a solution of water and alcohol. The aroma of ethyl vanillin, a synthetic fragrance is similar to vanilla, but since it is derived from petroleum, it is far less expensive. Ethyl vanillin smells like natural vanilla, but the aroma is not nearly as complex.

Inexpensive soaps like Arko often contain fragrances such as Amyl Cinnamal , Citronellol , Geraniol , Hexyl Cinnamal, and Linalool. While all of these chemicals is found naturally, the versions used are usually derived synthetically. They can often trigger allergic reactions. I cannot use Arko for this reason, but have no idea which ingredient is triggering my reaction.

There are companies who purchase famous fragrances, analyze them using gas chromatography and then figure out how to produce a similar fragrance using inexpensive ingredients. They can be sold at a fraction of the cost of the original. A soapmaker can purchase the fragrances and add them to their soap formula to make them smell similar to the famous fragrance.

There are also those who will purchase a famous fragrance, analyze it with their own nose and then try to replicate that scent by mixing various fragrances.  These are the fragrances that will generally be sold as "inspired by" fragrances. The quality of the fragrance will depend upon the skill of the perfumer, the sensitivity of the nose, and the quality of the fragrance ingredients used. Thus, they can range widely in quality.

Many soapmakers are good at developing soap formulations, but collaborate with skilled perfumers to develop scents. Because the ingredient used to product soaps have a scent of their own, just adding a pre-made scent to a soap formula will not necessarily provide a great aroma. That is why collaboration is needed between the perfumer and soap maker. The perfumer will adjust the scent to accommodate the scent of the soap.

Then there are those artisans who develop their own fragrances. Again, they can vary widely in quality. Depending on the skill and preferences on the artisan, you might or might not like the fragrances. For example, I like the Barrister and Mann Omnibus soap formulation, but I am not a fan of Will's scents, but there are exceptions like Passiflora that Will describes as an elegant, sophisticated, spicy fougère. His description is fitting.

I have collected well over 200 shaving soaps over the past 10 year. Some of the fragrances were disgusting to my nose. Some were acceptable. Others were exquisite. Over time, my nose has learned to appreciate complex fragrances, well blended from high quality ingredients.  I only add new soaps to my collection now if I am confident that the performance and the fragrance will both be outstanding.

Do people believe this? Pretty sure everything labeled as "inspired by" is just bought from some internet duper in eastern Europe.

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#7

Merchant
St. Louis, MO
(05-08-2023, 02:18 AM)jeffm54321 Wrote:
(05-07-2023, 11:52 PM)dominicr Wrote: Sir Henry insists on blending his own.

Sent from my SM-A716U1 using Tapatalk

What? What is this?

https://www.sirhenryssundries.com/drake/

"Drake is inspired by (not affiliated with) Drakkar Noir."

And this

https://www.sirhenryssundries.com/sandalwood/

"Introducing Sandalwood. Sandalwood is inspired by (not affiliated with) AOS Sandalwood."

And of course, 

https://www.sirhenryssundries.com/avenue/

"Avenue is inspired by (not affiliated with) Creed Aventus."
I should've been more clear.
Our Black Tie Razor Company brand has dupes. The Sir Henry's brand is all originals.

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Shave Sharp, Look Sharp
#8

Posting Freak
To be clear, I wasn’t being critical, but rather, factual. Scent is hard. Some have a talent for it and study to develop it and some don’t. Customers want products that smell good so however the soap makers get there is fine. To expect a complete beginner to be able to mix a commercially successful fragrance right out of the blocks would be like expecting an average driver to get behind the wheel of an F1 car and be able to actually drive it reasonably well

RayClem likes this post
#9
We blend ours in house, and we will not do cologne scented knock-offs. We do not "name" our soaps, but only use the EO/FO scents for easier understanding and ease of buying. We try not to replicate another soapers scent combo. Ours are somewhat unique. Plus it saves a paragraph of scent description if we don't "name" them. Some soapers are perfumers masquerading as soap makers. They can change or kill a line when a new idea is created. As long as we have sheep, we'll have Sheep Fat Shave Soap.

Marko likes this post
#10
(05-09-2023, 01:27 AM)Marko Wrote: To be clear, I wasn’t being critical, but rather, factual. Scent is hard. Some have a talent for it and study to develop it and some don’t. Customers want products that smell good so however the soap makers get there is fine. To expect a complete beginner to be able to mix a commercially successful fragrance right out of the blocks would be like expecting an average driver to get behind the wheel of an F1 car and be able to actually drive it reasonably well

As long as companies are clear about it, I don't care. I think when someone is vague or claims they made it it's just silly. I think dupes are probably great for folks looking at soaps who may know those scents and see it as less risk in an online purchase.

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