#1

Super Moderator
I've always been leery of amazon reviews because of experience and then all the talk of paid reviews and so forth but I've still occasionally posted my own reviews if I thought is was warranted.  

So to set the context, I use a CPAP machine for sleep apnea and I'm generally very good as far as compliance goes but I occasionally will get some irritation over the bridge of my nose from the mask - I use a nasal mask.  I've tried both nasal pillows and full nose/mouth masks and the nasal mask works best for me.  I usually just put Secaris ointment on the bridge of my nose and I'm good.  I saw a video with a nurse gearing up for a shift in this age of covid and she place a tape nose protector on the bridge of her nose so I went looking for that.  I couldn't find what I was looking for but on amazon they were showing this 3M MicroPore sensitive skin tape as an alternative.  There were several positive comments saying that they used it for CPAP issues.  Some even suggested putting the tape over your mouth to stop air leakage.  I figured I'd give it a try.  It wasn't good.  The tape sticks tenaciously to your skin making removal difficult and it leaves a sticky residue that doesn't easily wash off.  So I posted a 1 star review and said that people shouldn't buy the tape for CPAP issues - I kept the review factual and respectful but Amazon rejected the comment for violation of community guidelines.  Weird.  

Bottom line is, as far as I'm concerned Amazon reviews have Zero value in making informed buying decisions and probably aren't worth wasting your time reading except for entertainment.  And that 3M tape that cam in a box of 12 for $26 isn't returnable because its a personal care item.  I keep learning lessons the hard way.  Big Grin

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#2

Administrator
Philadelphia, PA
(08-14-2020, 03:49 PM)Marko Wrote: I've always been leery of amazon reviews because of experience and then all the talk of paid reviews and so forth but I've still occasionally posted my own reviews if I thought is was warranted.  

So to set the context, I use a CPAP machine for sleep apnea and I'm generally very good as far as compliance goes but I occasionally will get some irritation over the bridge of my nose from the mask - I use a nasal mask.  I've tried both nasal pillows and full nose/mouth masks and the nasal mask works best for me.  I usually just put Secaris ointment on the bridge of my nose and I'm good.  I saw a video with a nurse gearing up for a shift in this age of covid and she place a tape nose protector on the bridge of her nose so I went looking for that.  I couldn't find what I was looking for but on amazon they were showing this 3M MicroPore sensitive skin tape as an alternative.  There were several positive comments saying that they used it for CPAP issues.  Some even suggested putting the tape over your mouth to stop air leakage.  I figured I'd give it a try.  It wasn't good.  The tape sticks tenaciously to your skin making removal difficult and it leaves a sticky residue that doesn't easily wash off.  So I posted a 1 star review and said that people shouldn't buy the tape for CPAP issues - I kept the review factual and respectful but Amazon rejected the comment for violation of community guidelines.  Weird.  

Bottom line is, as far as I'm concerned Amazon reviews have Zero value in making informed buying decisions and probably aren't worth wasting your time reading except for entertainment.  And that 3M tape that cam in a box of 12 for $26 isn't returnable because its a personal care item.  I keep learning lessons the hard way.  Big Grin

Marko, check out pad a cheek, the lady who owns it makes a cover for the nasal masks that will probably fix your issue as I have the exact same issue with my cpap and the nasal mask I use...

https://www.padacheek.com/

I have one of her nose mask liners but haven't put it on my mask yet...imagine that!

this is the one I use: https://www.padacheek.com/product-page/mask-liner-wisp

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Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
#3

Member
Central Maine
FWIW, if others have issues with adhesive that's difficult to remove there are pads made that are solvent soaked that work like a charm for removal. Long after my heart surgery I still had adhesive all over me from everything that I'd been wired up to, etc;. I mentioned it at an office visit and was handed a bunch of them. Yeah, they work great. If they contained just one solvent I'd let you know what it was for a DIY option, but it's a shopping list of solvents.

Here's an Amazon link. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=medical+adhes...ss_sc_1_29

The PDI pads seen there are what I was handed.

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#4

Super Moderator
Thanks for the tip and link andrewjs18 I will give that thing a try.  Even though its working pretty good, I'm always looking to make it better.  

Thanks for that information ShadowsDad I knew there was such a thing but I've never needed it before.

Freddy likes this post
#5
Thirty some odd years our daughter had heart issues as an infant and we were constantly dealing with adhesive from the leads. Imagine dealing with that an an infant! Talk about crying! We found that WD40 did great removing the adhesive/residue. When the test was done, we’d spray the leads with the WD40, let them soak for a minute, and they’d come off easy peasy. People looked at us rather strange when we’d show up at the pediatric cardiologist with a can of WD40.

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#6

Super Moderator
San Diego, Cal., USA
Marko, I agree with you about Amazon's reviews.  I used to count on them for products I was interested in.  Now, I take them with a grain of salt.  I have even received a product that I was pleased with but inside the box was a card.  It stated that if I gave a 5-star review I would get an Amazon gift card good for either $5.00, $10.00, or $15.00 (I no longer remember the exact amount).  I was furious that Amazon permits this.  I also no longer remember whether the product came from Amazon or a third party seller on Amazon but the fact that Amazon permits this is shameful.  Of course, I did not post a review and the sad thing is, had there not been that card in the package I would have given a 5-star review.  To me, my integrity is worth more than a few dollars.

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#7

Super Moderator
(08-14-2020, 09:17 PM)Freddy Wrote: Marko, I agree with you about Amazon's reviews.  I used to count on them for products I was interested in.  Now, I take them with a grain of salt.  I have even received a product that I was pleased with but inside the box was a card.  It stated that if I gave a 5-star review I would get an Amazon gift card good for either $5.00, $10.00, or $15.00 (I no longer remember the exact amount).  I was furious that Amazon permits this.  I also no longer remember whether the product came from Amazon or a third party seller on Amazon but the fact that Amazon permits this is shameful.  Of course, I did not post a review and the sad thing is, had there not been that card in the package I would have given a 5-star review.  To me, my integrity is worth more than a few dollars.

Thats just crazy.  I read somewhere that companies will pay people a few cents per review transferred directly into their account making the practice of volume reviewing profitable.  I used to think that if a product had reviews numbering in the 100s or 1000s that there must be something to it but not anymore.  The practice of Fake Reviews completely undermines the point of the reviews.  Combine that with the likelihood of getting counterfeit merchandise from amazon and I have to say I agree with Elon Musk on this point - its time to break up amazon.

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