#1
This may have been posted elsewhere but I like the article and its insights. I had an open discussion with my Social Psychology instructor with my position being there should be (free market speaking) black-centric and white-centric barbershops. A barbershop is so much a part of our community and our culture that this is one place that it should be OK for a barbershop to cater to specific clientele. I just emailed her the same link so that she could see the background of my point of view and the specific importance of barbershops to a community. I hope you guys enjoy this article as much as I do.

PS, Its a pretty long read.

http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles...rbershops/

hawns, onethinline and Marko like this post
B&B Ban date 4 July 2016
My personal B&Blexit
True irony
#2

Member
San Francisco
Even a paragraph in, this looks great. Thank you for sharing. (Coincidentally, I'd finally read Ta-Nehisi Coates's The Case for Reparations this morning; fantastic article.)
David : DE shaving since Nov 2014. Nowadays giving in to the single-edge siren call.
#3

Posting Freak
Canada
Very interesting article and thank you for sharing. Shy
Celestino
Love, Laughter & Shaving  Heart
#4
"However, the nature of barbershops is changing, and I think technology is at work here. I’ve found that when folks are waiting around in barbershops, they’re much more likely to be on their cell phones than engaging with other people."

Sad, because barbershops black or white used to be people openly discussing the topics of the day. At least when I was a younger man (Hell I'm only 46 but I have seen it change).

Ahhhhh, the good old days.

DavidJames and ANG69 like this post
#5

scentless shaver
Oakland, ME
A great read, thanks for posting the link.
- Eric. What, am I done shaving already? Nuts, now I gotta wait again...
#6
(03-28-2016, 06:58 AM)EFDan Wrote: "However, the nature of barbershops is changing, and I think technology is at work here. I’ve found that when folks are waiting around in barbershops, they’re much more likely to be on their cell phones than engaging with other people."

Sad, because barbershops black or white used to be people openly discussing the topics of the day.  At least when I was a younger man (Hell I'm only 46 but I have seen it change).

Ahhhhh, the good old days.

Yes I saw that too and had to agree, but I think its a generational/age group thing. If I went to supercuts and saw a 25yo sitting for his turn, you know he would be engrossed in the smartphone. The same guy would probably do the same in a traditional barbershop, not knowing this is the perfect opportunity for a conversation.

A few weeks ago, in my barbershop, was the table with the stack of 3 yo magazines of Field and Stream and Popular Science. Whats not to like?

Cell phones are making us socially awkward and lacking any empathy for our fellow man. The art of conversation is retrograding.

onethinline likes this post
B&B Ban date 4 July 2016
My personal B&Blexit
True irony
#7

Chazz Reinhold HOF
I barely text and don't belong to social networks. I enjoy my privacy and I don't really care about reading when people took showers or what they ate.

ask4Edge likes this post
#8
The barber in the picture at the top looks like Eddie Murphy.
#9
Funny thing is when I started keeping a brush cut, I started cutting my own hair. Electric clippers and a little scissoring. Haven't been to a barbershop in 30 years and surprisingly no one can tell that I did the job myself? Go figure! I don't have a license, but I guess I am a self trained barber? I have cut several people's hair when they were too sick or lame to go to their barber? When where I lived had an old fashioned barber shop I went there regularly, but when the hair cutting business became a metrosexual beauty shop it was time to quit for me. The article is very interesting and looks at possible historical events from a different perspective. I like that kind of thinking.
#10

Member
South Saint Louis, MO
(This post was last modified: 03-28-2016, 05:34 PM by hawns.)
This was a really great article, thank you for sharing!

We have a scent coming out based on a story that's kind of relevant. A prominent figure in early St. Louis history, Henry Clamorgan, carried on a secret relationship with one of his slaves. They had children and a family, but when he died they were not allowed to be treated as regular members of society. Thusly, they founded Clamorgan's at Fourth and Pine, where they offered the finest grooming and dictated the sartorial trends in St. Louis, eventually influencing a burgeoning city despite their status as second-rate citizens.

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