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#421

Member
Virginia, USA
Fried peppers and onions with sweet Italian sausages and pierogies. I like to make the onions and peppers a day ahead if possible.
Be Cool, be Kind, and be Well
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#422

Merchant
Central Maine
I would definitely take a plate of that! We just made a mess of perogies and made a social event of it with a friend. We like then fried with an onion/butter sauce over them. Who doesn't like peperonata with sausages? (but make my sausages hot, they can't be too hot)
Brian. Lover of SE razors. Maker of Krampert's Finest Products.
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#423

Administrator
Philadelphia, PA
(05-03-2018, 02:08 AM)HighSpeed Wrote: Fried peppers and onions with sweet Italian sausages and pierogies.  I like to make the onions and peppers a day ahead if possible.

damn I'm itching for some good pierogies with sauteed onions. my grandmother used to make pierogies from scratch when I was younger.
Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
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#424

Merchant
Central Maine
My grandmom as well Andrew. She could really crank them out and all by hand. Just delicious! I was only a child and I still remember them, and her, all these decades later.

We still make ours from scratch, and that includes making the cheese.
Brian. Lover of SE razors. Maker of Krampert's Finest Products.
#425

Administrator
Philadelphia, PA
(This post was last modified: 05-06-2018, 12:37 AM by andrewjs18.)
(05-05-2018, 11:27 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: My grandmom as well Andrew. She could really crank them out and all by hand. Just delicious! I was only a child and I still  remember them, and her, all these decades later.

We still make ours from scratch, and that includes making the cheese.

my grandmother used to make her own cottage cheese. I can't recall if she it in her pierogies or not though.
Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
#426

Merchant
Central Maine
(This post was last modified: 05-06-2018, 06:14 AM by ShadowsDad.)
I bet it wasn't cottage cheese, but farmers cheese. Farmers cheese is incredibly easy to make. It just requires heat and a sterile acid (not biologically active cider vinegar; I made that mistake exactly once).

This last time we made perogies we made a few with a meat filling. They were good and showed promise, but IMO not as good as the traditional cheese filled. My only defense is that I'm a slave to tradition as I know it. We'll revisit a meat filling again though. I've also heard of fruit fillings, especially prune. To understand that, one must understand that perogies are peasant food. That's not a put down. My roots are from peasant stock, and most of the really great food of the world, like perogies, derives from peasant food. The nobility largely killed itself off from their crappy and "high end" diet. The peasants lived due to their diverse diet. But back to prune perogies... during the lean months, winter, what did they have to make food with? Grain and milk, and dried fruit. Prunes are dried plums, so prune perogies. A few for dessert (or breakfast?) would fill the space between the belt buckle and the spine when one has little else.
Brian. Lover of SE razors. Maker of Krampert's Finest Products.
#427

Administrator
Philadelphia, PA
(This post was last modified: 05-07-2018, 12:43 PM by andrewjs18.)
(05-06-2018, 06:05 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I bet it wasn't cottage cheese, but farmers cheese. Farmers cheese is incredibly easy to make. It just requires heat and a sterile acid (not biologically active cider vinegar; I made that mistake exactly once).

This last time we made perogies we made a few with a meat filling. They were good and showed promise, but IMO not as good as the traditional cheese filled. My only defense is that I'm a slave to tradition as I know it. We'll revisit a meat filling again though. I've also heard of fruit fillings, especially prune. To understand that, one must understand that perogies are peasant food. That's not a put down. My roots are from peasant stock, and most of the really great food of the world, like perogies, derives from peasant food. The nobility largely killed itself off from their crappy and "high end" diet. The peasants lived due to their diverse diet. But back to prune perogies... during the lean months, winter, what did they have to make food with? Grain and milk, and dried fruit. Prunes are dried plums, so prune perogies. A few for dessert (or breakfast?) would fill the space between the belt buckle and the spine when one has little else.

perhaps, I'm not sure and she's been gone since 2000. All I remember is she used to hang it in a cheese cloth.

my grandmother filled her pierogies with cheese and potatoes, meats and prunes.
Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
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