#1

Member
Los Angeles
This morning I received an email that appeared to be a “PHISHING” document. It was sent from Stan Hickman from Above The Tie. It said that Stan wanted me to follow him on Linked in. There was a rather large blue button that obviously wanted me to press it. It said “Do you know Stan Hickman”? If I am right and it was PHISHING it could have deposited a software program that could collect my personal information or to put Malware on my computer. If anyone receives this email use caution. I tried calling Stan at ATT this morning but he does not post his phone number. I wanted to ask him if he was aware of this however, nobody wants to talk to customers anymore. I am also sending this to him. It is better to side on caution until he can clear this up this issue.
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#2
Thanks for the heads-up TP
OG


"Do not regret growing older, its a privilege denied to many."
#3
I got the same message and clicked to accept. I then checked my LinkedIn account and I do see Stan's account included in my network. Hopefully, after all, that message was not a phishing email. Fingers crossed...
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#4

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
LinkdIn is legitimate as far as business networking sites go...
-Chris~Head Shaver~
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#5

Member
Los Angeles
(06-01-2017, 05:40 PM)BadDad Wrote: LinkdIn is legitimate as far as business networking sites go...

I agree, but I am not a member and I still don't know if the email is legit. Maybe if and when Stan replies to my email it will shed some light on this.
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#6

That Bald Guy with the Big Beard
Bishop, CA
(This post was last modified: 06-01-2017, 08:05 PM by BadDad.)
(06-01-2017, 05:48 PM)Tidepool Wrote:
(06-01-2017, 05:40 PM)BadDad Wrote: LinkdIn is legitimate as far as business networking sites go...

I agree, but I am not a member and I still don't know if the email is legit.  Maybe if and when Stan replies to my email it will shed some light on this.

If you're not a member of LinkdIn, then whether you approve or not is inconsequential. It would be like receiving a friend request from Facebook without being a facebook user...no profile, no link, no "friends"...you're not part of the network...

For reference, I am not a member of LinkdIn, and I do get the occasional invite from people that know me, but do not know I am not a member. It happens. It's an invitation to both join the network and add the individual if you do...
-Chris~Head Shaver~
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#7

Administrator
Philadelphia, PA
(This post was last modified: 06-01-2017, 08:51 PM by andrewjs18.)
not sure if you know how to do this or not, but can you paste the mail headers from the email? the email addresses associated are usually an instant sign if something is legitimate or not.
Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito.
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#8

Restitutor Orbis
I've been receiving emails likes this from Linkdn but I'm just ignoring them cause I don't have an account. Thought it was just spam or something, but thanks for the heads up.
#9
Cmon! You know you wanna! Just do it!

[Image: CqB5JbRUMAA8wGL1_zps7drseply.jpg]
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#10

Merchant
Nashville, TN
This is something I know a lot about.

First, good for you for being suspicious. Clicking on links like this are one of the two primary ways that these terrible breaches we read about in the news occur.

The way Linked in works, he could send you an invitation. If you click on it and accept, it will then ask you if you know him and will connect you. Unfortunately, the bad guys could send something that looks like an invite that is malicicous.

Based on ANG69's comment, this sounds legitimate because he is now connected with him.

Personally, I wouldn't join LinkedIn unless there was a reason, which I have due to my job.

Let's say for a moment that Tidepool had a LInkedIn account. He could avoid the link on the email, go to LinkedIn and search on his name and company if needed, then send him an invitation. His last name is Hickam, not Hickman.

At the end of the day, you absolutely did the right thing by reaching out to the sender, which is something I do often.

While I'm on a roll here, I would encourage everyone to sign up for multi-factor authentication with every company that offers it, get a password manager and use. I use LastPass and think it is the best one.

As well, there is malicious software for Apple computers, though not nearly as many as there are for Windows.
Hendrix Classics & Co.
Timeless Razors to Pass Along for Generations

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