#1
I'm trying to understand something. Can a ss razor be handmade? I know there are CNC machines that make the parts, but I've seen various posts claiming that Wolfmans are handmade and that's the reason it takes so much time to produce them or offer them to be more precise. I understand that the polishing process can take time but then you have the brushed ss without the extra polishing time. Both are very hard to get.
On the other hand, there are manufacturers who offer their brushed versions without wait, while the polished is offered from time to time. A good example is the Blackbird. This makes me think that it's all about driving demand. A brushed version could be offered with no wait, like it happened with the Guerilla for some time.

vasesm and wyze0ne like this post
#2

Member
San Jose, California
You are probably thinking a bit too much about Wolfman razors these days.

vasesm and Standard like this post
Sourav
#3
And what's your problem?

The guy is an artist. I was seeing photos from his lab that a member of another forum uploaded. The detailing is imitable. I am no longer looking to sell my razors to anyone here even though there was high interest, I've already removed the listings if that's your problem. I'm really interesting into understanding a business model.
#4

Super Moderator
(This post was last modified: 03-25-2018, 06:18 PM by Marko.)
I think that when a claim of hand made is made, its referring to the degree of handling after the machining.  The Wolfman WR1 that I bought just before things went crazy is a polished version, regular blade gap with the long handle.  The feel in the hand of the thing is very nice and the threads on the top cap / handle are unlike any I've ever experienced.  What do I mean by that?  Most of the threads on my 3 piece razors are smooth and functional.  Yes, but on this Wolfman they are like smooth and functional on steroids.  Its like liquid metal, like its made out of that bad cop from Terminator 2, they're amazing.  I know how threads are cut with a tap and die or the CNC milling machine equivalent but I don't know how James makes these threads so smooth. My only other "high end-ish" SS razor is the Above The Tie.  Its a nice razor and very efficient but it doesn't even come close and at the time I got the ATT it cost me slightly more than the Wolfman.  I've said before that I consider the ATT as a precision tool while the Wolfman is closer to functional art.  Thats just my opinion.  

[Image: WlSv98d.jpg]

Vinny Champion, 49erShaver, iShave and 4 others like this post
#5
(This post was last modified: 03-25-2018, 07:39 PM by Blagoja Rajevski.)
every machinist is an artist, Wolfman razors are more expensive because he is spending lots of time on polishing. Here is the problem, after 1 year of usage that polish will start to show fading away. Todays razor heads and top caps are machined by CNC and not manual milling. He does put a lot of work in his razors but the hardest part which is milling the top cap and base plate is done by the CNC, I can only imagine if he would of tried to do it manually himself it would take him too long and probably there would be variety in geometry from one razor to another, computer production is much more accurate and faster.

So lets summon the artistry down:

1. Head and top cap made by machine
2. Handles also made by CNC ( the machine itself?)
3. Wolfman polishing them and designing the razors and uploaded files in the computer so the CNC can produce them.

As you see the machine produces them and he does the final touch up, from what I heard on his own he can finish 10 razors daily ( that's what I heard while back, he might be producing more because you only get better and faster over time), 10 razors times nowadays cost is around $400 US dollars? That's $4000 a day. That should be around - + $120.000 a month minus lets say $10.000 -$15.000 in shop expenses and PP and other escrow payment fees etc.

Then there are people like me who actually do use the tools but there is no computer to cut stuff for me, lay out or do the installation, everything I do is practically done from scratch and I earn a year less than he earns in a month for polishing his designs. So what is so confusing about understanding his business model? Lots and lots of money, money is the driving force.

Here are few pics of what I do from scratch, so tell me where the true artistry is?
[Image: SgavekW.jpg]
[Image: zVHXU3c.jpg]
[Image: vDY4u4r.jpg]
[Image: RP7ZV1W.jpg]
[Image: d8zEyHo.jpg]
[Image: CZvRy8h.jpg]
[Image: VCiePcT.jpg]
[Image: tK4k09q.jpg]
[Image: dZ05pXG.jpg]
[Image: qmChZ0s.jpg]
[Image: nxgWEWx.jpg]
[Image: 2mEiwiz.jpg]
[Image: DhtMd1Z.jpg]
[Image: 5rhHNXZ.jpg]


I understand admiring a product, but don't give all the props of the product outcome to the worker when a computer guided machine does 90%+ of the manufacturing the product... Many people admire his products, but mostly all know PC machine is producing the pieces for him and he is just adding and removing milling bits and metal blocks for the product.... I admire the Wolfman razor looks too, but you are dishonest with your admiration and you are entering the fanboy section, soon enough someone from the forum will buy you cheerleading skirt and pompoms.

Standard and wyze0ne like this post
#6

Member
USA
(03-25-2018, 07:08 PM)Blagoja Rajevski Wrote: every machinist is an artist, Wolfman razors are more expensive because he is spending lots of time on polishing. Here is the problem, after 1 year of usage that polish will start to show fading away. Todays razor heads and top caps are machined by CNC and not manual milling. He does put a lot of work in his razors but the hardest part which is milling the top cap and base plate is done by the CNC, I can only imagine if he would of tried to do it manually himself it would take him too long and probably there would be variety in geometry from one razor to another, computer production is much more accurate and faster.

So lets summon the artistry down:

1. Head and top cap made by machine
2. Handles also made by CNC ( the machine itself?)
3. Wolfman polishing them and designing the razors and uploaded files in the computer so the CNC can produce them.

As you see the machine produces them and he does the final touch up, from what I heard on his own he can finish 10 razors daily ( that's what I heard while back, he might be producing more because you only get better and faster over time), 10 razors times nowadays cost is around $400 US dollars? That's $4000 a day. That should be around - + $120.000 a month minus lets say $10.000 -$15.000 in shop expenses and PP and other escrow payment fees etc.

Then there are people like me who actually do use the tools but there is no computer to cut stuff for me, lay out or do the installation, everything I do is practically done from scratch and I earn a year less than he earns in a month for polishing his designs. So what is so confusing about understanding his business model? Lots and lots of money, money is the driving force.

Here are few pics of what I do from scratch, so tell me where the true artistry is?
[Image: AnGVKcq.jpg]
[Image: T6Dfvke.jpg]
[Image: avbisqM.jpg]
[Image: cmEizMV.jpg]
[Image: XBdrJF0.jpg]
[Image: EXKmD2m.jpg]
[Image: 7GoryHi.jpg]
[Image: WBmrQsu.jpg]
[Image: ReJwbzp.jpg]
[Image: FtzylPY.jpg]
[Image: NNH8tBZ.jpg]
[Image: NBGqIT5.jpg]
[Image: rVTrdc1.jpg]
[Image: 37rYXjU.jpg]

I understand admiring a product, but don't give all the props of the product outcome to the worker when a computer guided machine does 90%+ of the manufacturing the product... Many people admire his products, but mostly all know PC machine is producing the pieces for him and he is just adding and removing milling bits and metal blocks for the product.... I admire the Wolfman razor looks too, but you are dishonest with your admiration and you are entering the fanboy section, soon enough someone from the forum will buy you cheerleading skirt and pompoms.


What’s the purpose for attacking a person who admires an artisans work? So what if someone is a fanboy as you put it. Does that make the work any less impressive? I see you are making quite a few assumptions regarding production, cost, and profit. Not to say you are incorrect. If you are correct that he is averaging 10 razors a day every day and has a drop maybe twice a month using your math that would be a 140 razors at a time, that sell out in a matter of minutes? If that’s the case then there are quite a few fan boys out there.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
#7
(This post was last modified: 03-25-2018, 07:48 PM by Blagoja Rajevski.)
I'm not attacking you for admiring, I'm pointing out that you are waving with your pompoms too high.

1. Do you realize that 90% of the Wolfman razors is done by a computerized machine and not by his hands?
2. Do you realize the amount he earns is mostly in polishing and exchanging bits and metal blocks

You are not admiring, you are becoming a fanboy and raising machinist skills to a god like pedestal when in fact if there is anyone to be put on the pedestal is the CNC machine that he uses...
#8

Member
USA
(This post was last modified: 03-25-2018, 08:16 PM by Vinny Champion.)
(03-25-2018, 07:46 PM)Blagoja Rajevski Wrote: I'm not attacking you for admiring, I'm pointing out that you are waving with your pompoms too high.

1. Do you realize that 90% of the Wolfman razors is done by a computerized machine and not by his hands?
2. Do you realize the amount he earns is mostly in polishing and exchanging bits and metal blocks

You are not admiring, you are becoming a fanboy and raising machinist skills to a god like pedestal when in fact if there is anyone to be put on the pedestal is the CNC machine that he uses...


Who me? I think you may be confusing me with someone else. I prefer Charcoal Goods and paradigm.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
#9

Merchant
Nashville, TN
I don't know what kind of equipment Wolfman has and how much is automated. This makes me think about brush makers, many of whom are on this forum. My Maggard brand brushed are nice acrylic. I would consider them mass produced. We have brush makers turning handles in acrylic. Few would consider them anything but artistic.

I make straight razor scales, which I consider handmade. I do have power tools that I use, though none that automate any of the processes. Taking the craftsmanship and lack of automation out of the equation, I can tell you that properly making and fitting a pair of straight razor scales is much, much, much harder than you would think. There may be more to getting the tolerances Wolfman achieves than you would think.

My favorite razor handle is a Maggards brand fat stainless steel handle. I would imagine that it was made on a CNC machine. I can also say that I don't consider it to be fine quality or a work of art. I had to flatten the base myself to get it to stand up correctly. Also, I'm not aware of discussion regarding which type of stainless steel he uses. There are many, many types of stainless steel and the price varies. There are knife blanks I can purchase where the 440C version is $25 and the CPMS 90V version is $100 - same product made from different steel.

My point in all of this is not to stand up for Wolfman. I don't follow him and don't have any of his products. I guess my point is that things can be more complicated than you think.

Vinny Champion, andrewjs18 and vasesm like this post
#10
Before this thread gets terminated, my 2 cents worth
- apparently Wolfman has chosen to be a one man shop
- apparently Rockwell has chosen to find big higher volume shops including some off shore facilities

Both produce excellent products. Both are probably following their business model. Both are probably happy in their work.
One obviously will have a more inventory and product to sell.

Vinny Champion, Marko and 49erShaver like this post


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)